Frist Center for the Visual Arts

Liza Kawaller, Chuck Beard, Machaela Nesler, and Tom Eizonas.

Thank YOU, thank YOU, thank YOU. Hello Again! Welcome to another wonderful collaboration between East Side Story and The Post. Let me be the first to officially, whole-heartedly welcome you to the recap and recording of the 98th epic edition of East Side Storytellin’! Like the 97, I repeat … 97, previous shows East Side Story has put together, we all decided to take a break from our busy schedules all over town in order to sit back and relax and get everyone cultured up just right in the form of a Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Without further ado, fulfilling the entertainment portion of your day, this is the recap and recording of East Side Storytellin’ 98. Let us begin, again.

Our first featured artist of the evening is someone I first met as a fellow “judge” at an event for Southern Word at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts not too long after she moved to town. She is not just a judge. She is an artist. She was trained in an acting conservatory and spent some quality personal growing time in LA. Instead of reading other people’s lines, she decided that making her own was way more fun. She began writing one day while studying abroad, and hasn’t stopped since. She likes to explore topics that may be traditionally difficult to talk or think about, all the while giving people the mental space to sit with some cognitive dissonance through her work. She is also on the development committee of Southern Word, but tonight she is here to share her Southern words. The room was filled with friends, old and new, to listen and pay attention to the wonderful Liza Kawaller.

Liza stepped to the mic and completely blew everyone away. I’m serious. I mean, I had seen her read before and expected something awesome, but she really outdid herself. She did a piece about someone on death row, another person battling addiction, some ladies inside of sex trafficking, and then something inspirational for people going through the process of change. Throughout her powerful words, words she recited from memory alone mind you, she changed her tempo and inflection from slow to extremely fast and soft as a whisper to “get out of my way because I have something to say that will not only smack you in the face, it will change your mind-set” kind of poems. At one point, it almost sounded like she was singing within her verses. It was a fantastical verbal journey and roller coaster. It was a mental ride that many people in our society need to go on these days. I was honored to witness it in person and in the front row, but I’m also thankful you can go back and listen to her selected works again and again in the recording below. Do yourself a favor, and take a listen below and go to the next reading Liza performs. You’re welcome.

Our featured music of the night was brought to my attention by a very dear group of mutual friends who just so happened to be in the crowd on this night and were recently added to the East Side Storytellin’ family in that of The Arcadian Wild. Born in Nashville and raised in music, this lady inherited her father’s ear for songwriting and was gifted a voice like few other from another higher power. She is a young artist with an old soul, combining years of experience with a wealth of tested raw talent. With the release of her first EP titled Bulletproof, she is more than ready to make 2017 unforgettable in the best of ways. I can’t say too many great things about this amazing woman with songs of gold. I’m talking about Ms. Machaela Nesler. Remember this name. Remember her smile. Remember her songs.

Machaela approached the stage in noticeable awe of following Liza’s powerful performance. I made a comment of assurance in between the final set-up time with Tom because I knew from hanging out before the show and listening to her work on a new song in the making during soundcheck that this was going to be a killer pairing of a show. I wasn’t wrong. Machaela sang original, heartbreaking, personal, and raw lyrics with soft volumes and melodies that were not only brilliant, but everyone in the room instantly connected with her and her music. Opting to share her brand new song, barely finished with writing the lyrics or living them, she had to pause a few times to let the tears take their place on her face and the set. Everyone in the room wanted to give her a virtual hug to let her know everything was okay and she was so brave to share something so beautiful and personal with a room of friends and attentive strangers, but I think she got the message and feeling crystal clear as she mustered up enough strength to finish her song and her set of other songs just as touching. I know I’m a barrel of compliments on these recaps, but Machaela’s set and Machaela in general won over this crowd and made a very special moment like few I’ve ever witnessed in this city (no matter who was on the bill or what venue was closest to The Ryman or not). Again, I’m being totally serious, this artist is yet another star that will be appreciated by many and will connect with countless before her time is over. Just listen to the recording below and buy her music online already.

Before I get to the ending of this recap, I just want to say that I was honored to have both Liza and Machaela on East Side Storytellin’. There were a few people who came to the show and spoke with me afterwards that let me know it was their first time to see our show and that this was a tremendous beginning to them coming to many more sooner than later. They enjoyed the reading, the music, and the interview afterwards where I got to get just below the creative surface and smiles of what inspires Liza and Machaela to create and share their creative and enlightening art. You can tell from the picture below that we all had a fun time on a random Tuesday night to get this 2017 off in the right direction.

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Liza and Machaela for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us. They are both so brave and inspiring to share such beautiful, gut-wrenching, and REAL material for us all to digest and relate with going forward in our own personal adventures.

And so, it is my honor to now share the edited version of East Side Storytellin’ 98 that featured the likes of Liza Kawaller and Machaela Nesler at The Post on Tuesday, January 3rd, 2016. Enjoy, and share with everyone you know, over and over again. Thank you and you’re welcome-

You can read more of Liza’s writing here – @lkawaller (official website soon to follow this year)

You can listen to more of Machaela’s music here – machaelanesler.bandcamp.com

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website, www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own WordsTab – see here – www.eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, my lovely wife and most talented artist in Emily Harper Beard (efharper), and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

I’d also like to show much love to Clay Brunton. He normally makes all of the beautiful artwork online to promote the shows, but he had to take time away from that task this week because his mother started chemo for her battle against Cancer. Please send extra love and prayers for his family during this time.

Last, but certainly not least, I’d like to give one last shout out to Tonya and Chris and the staff who stay open late for us and for making The Post so welcoming and positively life-changing for the East Nashville community-at-large.

Our next show will be

East Side Storytellin’ 99

Tuesday, January 17th

at The Post (1701 Fatherland Street) at 7pm

reading- Matt Urmy (www.matturmy.com

singing- Joanna Barbera (joannabarbera.com)

That said, that’s all for East Side Storytellin’ 98 and another fabulous event at The Post with East Side Story at the helm. Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word and giving some love to all of these great Nashville artists and our creative ideas. Please remember to be nice to one another out there.

Much love,

mE

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Chuck Beard, Jessica Martindale, Kyle Martindale, Dave Eastman, and Tom Eizonas

Chuck Beard, Jessica Martindale, Kyle Martindale, Dave Eastman, and Tom Eizonas

Thank YOU, thank YOU, thank YOU. Hello Again! Welcome to another wonderful collaboration between East Side Story and The Post. Let me be the first to officially, whole-heartedly welcome you to the recap and recording of the 94th epic edition of East Side Storytellin’! Like the 93, I repeat … 93, previous shows East Side Story has put together, we all decided to take a break from our busy schedules all over town in order to sit back and relax and get everyone cultured up just right in the form of a Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Without further ado, fulfilling the entertainment portion of your day, this is East Side Storytellin’ 94. Let us begin, again.

Actually, befoer we get all further ado, I have to give a big salute to the main maestro, the first voice you hear on every single East Side Storytellin’ recording we’ve ever had, Dave Eastman. He made his annual trek to the live microphone feed to give the audience a feel for our humble beginnings to our humble present state of the show after 93 other trial periods of creative experimentation. Dave is dear friend of the show and to Tom and myself. He’s had to face a handful of personal hurdles this past year, more than most in years past, so it was a tremendous delight to see him back up on his feet and entertaining people with his words and wit as he was gifted to do. We are forever grateful for his part in our ongoing and growing story, and we look forward to seeing and hearing all of the great things he is gonna do in the upcoming year. Side note, I felt pretty official getting an introduction from the big guy. I’m not saying I’m Johnny Carson or anything, but what I am saying is that Dave is a true professional and always knocks it out of the park. Having him start the show was a wonderful way to kick off the 5th year of East Side Storytellin’.

Now, back to the show at hand. Our first featured artist of the evening is a poet, writer and teacher. He has taught 3 years in Metro Nashville at Antioch High School, and, like our last show’s featured author, has helped countless students grow creatively and with great, successful leaps and bounds with their levels of literacy. Not one to confine himself in the traditional school setting, this guy also contributed towards an award-winning curriculum design with the Frist Center for the Visual Arts. He pursued his MFA in Creative Writing at San Diego State University (shout out to Marshall Faulk). He and his wife live in East Nashville and write beautiful songs (some you may hear soon enough) with their dog, Lucky (who you will not see soon). Ladies and Gentleman, I’m talking about the one and only Kyle Martindale.

Before the show, Kyle was having a minor difficult decision to either read from one of his usual go-to short stories or to break out a newer one that was more relative to the holiday season. And when I say holiday season, I’m not fast-forwarding to Christmas like Walmart. I’m talking about staying in the Halloween season. That’s right. Kyle opted to read a story titled, The City in Holes. He told me it included vampires, so you know I was all game.

photo by Chance Chambers

Kyle jumped up to the mic and jumped right into the story after laying down a minor preface to the crowd and letting them know that the story would include a piano tuner and a wealthy vampire. Typically, from my experience from 93 shows in the past, I’ve found that if an author reads straight through one narrative piece for their entire time that the vibe will eventually lull at any given point after ten minutes in. With Kyle, that was never the case. Kyle took us on several trips with Nashville as the backdrop and, at times, a character of the story he was sharing (mind you, it was only one chapter of it too). There was a moment, the passage where Kyle described the city through beautiful and poetic descriptions and metaphors of music and landscape and holes, where it felt like we are all flying over the city and taking it in an entirely new perspective. It was quite wondrous. I’ll let you take a listen to him in the recording below and let him personally guide you on said trip and get you sucked into the story about a vampire you’ve never heard about before. This guy is such a talented writer and reader.

Our featured musician of the night is a singer/songwriter who, who am I kidding. The best person to introduce this woman is her husband. From the words he wrote, “This lady is more than a songwriter. There is courage in her pulse, an aching wisdom in her voice. She has been a behavioral therapist, rising HR guru, struggling artist and has sometimes staggered through seasons of life.” Back to my words, we are very thankful to have this songstress superstar bring her beautiful melodies and messages to the forefront of our very special anniversary show. The room was packed with family and friends and they erupted in a big applause for the talented Jessica Martindale.

photo by Chance Chambers

photo by Chance Chambers

Jessica immediately gave mad love and respect for the featured author, her husband. She shouted, “How hot was that reader?” It was the perfect way to get her set going in a comfortable manner. Side note, I just found it out right before the show, Jessica had surgery 3 weeks ago to take out her tonsils. She was unaware about how the show would even go the week prior, if at all. But, as fate would have it, her voice was in great condition and the setting was right for her to knock us all out with her beautiful music. She sang about honest and pure songs written about a quarter-life crisis, a song inspired by Huckleberry Finn that was written and recorded for a special project within 24 hours, a sad song about finding closure with a friendship that needed to close, a tribute to an experience in India helping and honoring victims of sex trafficing, another about finding the reasons and purpose for making art, and then she came back full circles to Kyle’s holes in the city with a song with the lyrics of walking around with holes in her shoes. Again, I’ll let you listen to her tell it how it is and how it should be in your world with the recording below, but it is truly something special.

When the just applause faded, I was able to ask Kyle and Jess a few personal and professional questions to get to some of their stories under the surface. You know, like the how did they meet and how do they help each other as two creatives married to one another in the same household kind of thing. It wasn’t too much like the Newly Married Game Show, but I thought it had a nice flow to it. This was the first time in our history where the author and the musician were married. We’ve had duets before, but nothing like this. It was definitely a treat. For instance, I mention it in the recording, but it was so sweet to see Kyle mouthing the words to Jess’ songs in real time, like he was Will Smith mouthing every other actor’s lines in the same scene in the early years of The Fresh Prince of Bel Aire (anyone who is a fan knows what I’m talking about). See evidence below –

Kyle and Jess were so candid and cute and everything that a creative couple should aspire to, at home and when performing together. They said this event was the first time they had shared the stage and shared their original work in that manner. I told them they shouldn’t stop from here. I see many house shows and tours together with stories and songs in the near future. We are honored and so glad to have been given the oppportunity to give them such a stage and platform to share their gifts as they continue to grow as trendously talented artists and loving people.

photo by Chance Chambers

photo by Chance Chambers

I’m serious though. Take a listen to the recording below and listen to some of the amazing, altruistic efforts these two souls are doing for the world, locally and globally. From teaching creative writing at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts alongside the current exhibitions and both helping teach the youth about stories through A Novel Idea Nashville to washing the feet of victims of sex trafficing in India with the Rescue Freedom International organization, these two people are worth your time and energy and friendship to get to know better. But before you go following them online and finding out where you can see them live next, check out this recording (appreciate it fully and then share it with others).

So here it is, the edited recording of East Side Storytellin’ 94, the 4 year anniversary show that featured Kyle and Jessica Martindale at The Post on Tuesday, November 1, 2016. Please listen to it and share with everyone you know, over and over again.

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Kyle and Jessica for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

You can read more about Kyle’s writing here- https://twitter.com/kyle_martindale

You can listen to more of Jessica’s music here – http://jessicamartindale.com

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website, www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own WordsTab – see here – www.eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, my lovely wife and most talented artist in Emily Harper Beard (efharper), and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

A big thanks to Dave Eastman, again, for being the main voice and introduction for us to our fans every time out of the gate. You’re the man, and your friendship is greatly appreciated.

I’d also like to show much love to Clay Brunton for the beautiful artwork online to promote the show.

Last, but certainly not least, I’d like to give one last shout out to Tonya and Chris for making The Post so welcoming and positively life-changing for the East Nashville community at large.

Our next show will be …

East Side Storytellin’ 95

Tuesday, November 15th

at The Post (1701 Fatherland Street) at 7pm

reading- Patricia Albrecht (http://patriciaalicealbrecht.com)

singing- Molly Parden (www.mollyparden.com)

That said, that’s all for East Side Storytellin’ 94 and another fabulous event at The Post with East Side Story at the helm. That’s also all for four years of epic shows in the bag.  Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word and giving some love to all of these great Nashville artists and our creative ideas.

Please remember to be nice to one another out there.

Much love,

mE

PS- Tom Eizonas & Dave Eastman, as another surprise gift to mE (Chuck Beard), put together this very special compilation of one song from each show from the 4th year of East Side Storytellin’. Now I give it to you to enjoy and share and spread the word about every show in the past and future.

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Evidence that we finished the race together from the start of this post so you and my mom won't worry any longer :)

Evidence that we finished the race together from the start of this post so you and my mom won’t worry any longer 🙂

On the morning of Saturday, November 28th, 2015, when most people in their right minds were spending the Saturday after Thanksgiving with family and loved ones, surrounding themselves with extra servings of turkey leftovers and football games as far as their hungry eyes could see, my good friend Derrick Pierce and I ran a marathon in my hometown of Bowling Green, Kentucky. Before you get this post twisted, this is not a shaming post to inspire you to get off the couch or to discourage the act of appreciating the remnants of Thanksgiving as long as you can. I love both of those ideas much more than I do training and running a marathon, especially a 2-person marathon without an official time or road closures or medals or bib numbers or photo finishes. This is a post of remembering our loved ones.

Like stretching our muscles before the big run, this race has a brief story before the story that clarifies the situation and sets the mood. On August 29th, I received the following email from the husband of another close friend, Adriana Melnyk Brandt:

Adriana’s father Rusty has been in hospice at home for a little over a week.  He passed away this afternoon.

In his final days he was comforted by Joy, Adriana, and other friends and family members and was able to listen to a playlist of the final Grateful Dead shows from earlier this month, which brought him comfort. Rusty was a lifelong Deadhead amongst his many amazing skills and sense of humor.  I will personally miss him dearly and am forever indebted to him for his life advice, and letting me marry his daughter.

They also played the following concert, which Rusty saw when he was in college in upstate NY. We all listened to it together as a family on our back porch last summer, before we moved to Utah.  He may or may not have, in his own words, “dropped acid and eaten a fist-full of reds and blues” while at this show. The show is a great one (unaided) and we ask that you keep Rusty, Joy, and Adriana in your thoughts while you listen to it.

The show ends with a jam of Saint Stephen (Rusty’s favorite song) / Not Fade Way / Goin’ Down the Road Feeling Bad / Not Fade Away / Turn on Your Lovelight.  Even if you don’t know the music, the titles alone are fitting. The jam is even preceded by Big Railroad Blues (Rusty worked for the railroad for many years before retiring in 2012).

Rusty Melnyk displaying his old school, dreamy, pensive looks which Adriana said was very much him his entire life.

Rusty Melnyk displaying his old school, dreamy, pensive looks which Adriana said was very much him his entire life.

Rusty Melnyk snoozing after another successful family Thanksgiving in 2013 (I told you this isn't a post about shaming people on couches on Thanksgiving!)

Rusty Melnyk snoozing after another successful family Thanksgiving in 2013 (I told you this isn’t a post about shaming people on couches on Thanksgiving!)

Upon receiving the email, I was heartbroken for Adriana. I cannot fathom losing my father so I immediately reached out to her to talk and catch up but that didn’t happen. Understandably, she was in a place where she needed time to let it all sink in. I respected her space and told her to let me know when she was able to talk. I felt even worse about things because I hadn’t talked with Adriana in a very long time. She had moved out to Utah in the past year, received her doctorate, and had also taken up a love of ultra marathon running due to her love of finishing everything she starts and a deep appreciation for the outdoors and wondrous landscapes of the West.

Later that same day of receiving the email about Adriana’s dad, I was in a text message with several other mutual friends of Adriana and Derrick when it dawned on me that I had not seen Derrick since he and I ran the Music City Marathon in Nashville back in 2009. Soon after that race, Derrick moved to Arkansas to start up his own successful optometry practice and has been busy ever since in his own world. Hearing the news that Derrick had gone through a divorce not too long ago without me knowing about it, I was feeling two-for-two of being a real shitty friend in time of need for two people I deeply care about and love very much.

To preface this preface = Adriana and Derrick and I first became the closest of friends when we all lived and studied abroad together in the spring of 2001 in Merida, Mexico through a program offered by Centre College. There are too many stories to tell about those adventures and the ones that followed so I’ll leave that for another post altogether.

Centre in Mexico 2kuno = Semana Santa Easter Festival in Antigua, Guatemala 2001. Adriana and Derrick and me in the middle with other amigos

Centre in Mexico 2kuno = Semana Santa Easter Festival in Antigua, Guatemala 2001. (Pictured from left to right: Julia Muchard, Prescott Hoffman (God rest his soul), TJ Brown, Lucas Joyner, Adriana, mE in the back, Derrick, and Sam Beiting.

Another shot from Spring Break 2001 on the weeklong adventure in Mexico and Guatemala. This is me, Derrick, Adriana, Sam, Julia, Lucas, TJ (tejota), and Prescott (God rest his soul, gone too early in a tragic accident soon after graduation).

Another shot from Spring Break 2001 in a forest in Palenque, Chiapas during our weeklong adventure in Mexico and Guatemala. This is mE on the tree, Derrick, Adriana, Sam Beiting, Julia Muchard, Lucas Joyner, TJ Brown (tejota), and Prescott Hoffman (God rest his soul, gone too early in a tragic accident soon after graduation).

I texted Derrick to see if he’d like to catch up via a phone call that very evening and he promptly answered my call. He assured me that all was well in his world, professionally and personally, and then I brought up the news and idea I had to honor Adriana and her family. Here is the brief phone conversation:

Me: Hey, do you still run a lot?

Derrick: Well, I have run a few marathons this year already but I’m definitely taking a break until the fall.

Me: Derrick, you do realize that it’s August and you said you’ve ran a few marathons this year and it’s almost fall, right? You could have just said yes.

Derrick: True. What do you have in mind, chizzucles?

Me: Well, are you coming back to Kentucky for the holidays at all?

Derrick: I’ll definitely be in for Thanksgiving.

Me: Okay. Let me talk to Adriana and then get back to you.

Derrick: Deal. I’m down for whatever.

I emailed Adriana right back after chewing the fat with Derrick and she said that she would only be back East for Christmas. I had to tell her that that would not be good timing for the idea to happen on my end and we’d have to stick to Thanksgiving without her physically being present because I couldn’t train for my idea and then not follow through with the race if my wife went into labor and had our first child around Christmas (talk about an announcement on the fly within close circles – we are due on December 30th but it looks like it will come early – we don’t know what we are having but we know it’s – shim’s – a giant). Adriana totally understood and was happy just to be in the loop.

So, here was the initial idea before the run:

I would map out a race route around Bowling Green, Kentucky that would start and end at my parents’ home on Garvin Lane. It would feature spots along the route that not only highlighted past memories and current homes of family and friends where they could set up mini-cheer/aid stations for us, but it would also let Derrick get a good view of everything Bowling Green has to appreciate = check.

I enlisted my good friend Alex Smith, a great artist and screen printer who just opened a new business in downtown BG called The A-Frame, to make special t-shirts to commemorate the race and all involved = check.

Derrick sent me two training schedules. He sent the second one saying this one is a bit more difficult than the first if you aren’t skeered … knowing full well that I would do the second one after that message. Derrick can run a marathon in 3.5 hours so it would be the perfect set-up for me to finally run one in under 4 (even if 3:59:59). After all, we weren’t running to qualify for any other races in the near future.

With the training and race in the books, and a few family members and friends lined up to make an appearance along the route to help us on the day of the run, all was set for another epic adventure to be had together. Then tragedy struck again.

Two weeks on the dot from the race day, a guy I once knew in high school, Justin Griffin, fell to his death on the other side of the world. Justin was a Kentucky state champion runner and classmate at Bowling Green Senior High School and someone who always drove others to smile more, run faster, and be nicer to one another. He was a driven soul who inspired others to expect more out of themselves as well. Since our time together in high school, Justin went on to become an award-winning professional designer & builder and world-renowned climber and father of his first and only baby this past year. He was at the tail end of a few weeks of volunteering on a special project in Nepal and also marking a new historic climbing route when he slipped. You can read all about his final adventure here – www.climbing.com/news/tragedy-follows-first-ascent-in-nepal/.

Justin Griffin- picture and words to read on this link by his friend Conrad Anker- https://www.instagram.com/p/-jTucnMFpG/

Justin Griffin- picture and words to read on this link by his friend Conrad Anker- https://www.instagram.com/p/-jTucnMFpG/

The news of Justin’s passing hit me extremely hard. The fact that he was doing something he loved dearly instead of a traditional career path and also that he was a fairly new father put some major life things in perspective for me just when I needed them. Also, my heart went out to his younger sister, Lane, who I was closer to than Justin but hadn’t talked to in a handful of years beyond checking in with her on Facebook here and there. Regardless, she is someone I still care deeply about and have since we first became friends way back when. Side note, Lane ended up attending Centre College as well as Bowling Green Senior High School with me. She’s way smarter than me though. Side side note, I found out that in this time of family adversity, Lane was expecting the birth of her second child at any minute too (I’m very happy to report that Juniper Justin Valiante was born four days post-BG race and everyone is happy and healthy!).

I called Alex and asked if he could make a name addition to the t-shirt design he was creating secretively in his art studio. I had emailed Alex the original email from Adriana highlighted above about her father and his love of the Grateful Dead and asked that he come up with something original for the race as he might for his custom concert t-shirts. I told him that the race name was going to be “Grateful 4 the Dead Run” and he loved it. I asked that he include the name of Adriana’s dad under the artwork and also Justin’s as well.

Alex did me one better. The day before the run, he added “1st annual” and I said that that was a brilliant idea so that we could do something every year from now on going forward to honor our friends and friends of friends who pass away in the year in between (sort of like the memorandum at the Oscars). It wouldn’t have to be something huge, like a marathon, or to raise tons of money, but it would be something very near and dear to all those who wish to participate.

"Grateful 4 the Dead run" t-shirt designed and made by Alex Smith

“The 1st Annual Grateful 4 the Dead Run” t-shirt designed and printed by Alex Smith. If you want one, email Alex at jas1239@gmail.com or visit The A-Frame at 1229 Center Street in Bowling Green today!

Fast-forward to the morning of Saturday, November 28th, and I’m fully dressed and ready to run and waiting for Derrick to show up at my parent’s house. I heard the dogs barking and I walked outside to see Derrick pretty much matching me from head to toe without planning our running gear. I instantly thought of my good friend Michael Brechner and almost was overcome with emotions on top of the laughing Derrick and I were doing when seeing each other for the first time in 5 years. Michael is one of the coolest and nicest people I have ever met. He works with my wife at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts and is currently battling cancer via chemo treatment for the second time in just over a year. Prayers his way are welcome, but the thing that distinctly made me think of Michael in terms of our running attire was that he always takes pictures of co-workers or friends who dress alike on accident and posts them online and in his office. He calls them twinkies, I believe.

I think I needed Michael’s positivity and spirit and Derrick’s enthusiasm to get going that specific morning because it was raining something steady. Derrick had packed for all sorts of weather and even planned on possibly canceling the run outdoors if it rained a flood. I told him there was no way I could do 26.2 miles on a treadmill and we took off into the mist without further questions.

We seemed to have all of life’s answers with the wind at our backs. By the end of the first mile at the turn off of Garvin Lane, we had run an amazing 8-minute mile (we only needed to maintain around a 9-minute pace for time goal) and I probably talked for the entire 8 minutes, trying to fit in 5 years of updates to get on the same page with Derrick. Both of those things would come back to haunt me.

The rain wasn’t too much to handle and it wasn’t too cold either. I believe the slow, consistent drizzle helped us both slow down into a more natural pace to weather the route and the budding storm looming ahead. Our first turns around old neighborhoods took us right by my childhood education of St. Joseph Catholic School. I could almost hear Coach Gorman telling me to sprint up the steps faster or making some joke that also served as inspiration. And speaking of Coach Gorman, we ran past his offices, turning at the Bowling Green Hot Rods minor league baseball park and headed towards our first aid station, The A-Frame.

My mom was waiting for us at The A-Frame, holding some water and Powerade and her camera phone, as my dad and Alex were holding court. Alex told us that he had the shirts printed and ready and I told him I’d take a look at them when we returned on the 2nd pass at around 22 miles. Derrick and I slowed but not to a stop (at least I didn’t stop while Derrick found our first of several outdoor restrooms). We kept moving along.

Derrick scoping out our next bathroom location and me getting love from Alex Smith at The A-Frame

We circled Western Kentucky University’s campus off of Kentucky Avenue, past the big football stadium where family past and present have played (Go Tops!), and then took a right, appropriately, on Nashville Road to the next station. Out in front of my cousin’s childhood home was my cousin Leslie and her growing family with tons of signs and water and Powerade and smiles in the pouring rain. Anyone who has run at all knows just how much each and every ounce of positivity goes a long way. Derrick and I were feeling good about our run at this point, but it all helped.

Chase and Jamie Gaddie showing us some original signage

Dad with the much needed Powerade

Dad with the much needed Powerade

We took a left and a left and then ran by Uncle Mike’s humble abode. At Mike’s house, my mom was the solo cheerleader. She had said she was game for keeping up with us along the way (probably 51% or more out of concern and 49% or less out of cheering for us, but she’s a mom and that’s what they do, right?) but we didn’t fully know until she was alone that she was down to be our traveling support team throughout. Again, it meant the world to both of us.

Through our first major traffic light, we crossed into the hood of Bent Tree right after passing by Grandmother Beard’s house. Grandmother (because if you know Betty Jo at all then you already know her name is Grandmother) was accompanied by my mom and dad and brother Austin and Taylor and my aunt Page. That was the first time I had to use nature’s restroom before the crowd (hence, the solo pictures below).

Derrick keeping the pace while I stepped to the side for a sec

Derrick keeping the pace while I stepped to the side for a sec

a little lighter and back on track

a little lighter and back on track

the cheering squad on Euclid

the cheering squad at Grandmother’s

We weaved in and around several blocks in Bent Tree and spit out near my brother Drew’s house a few hoods over. We somehow missed my mom and Taylor and nobody was at Drew’s yard when we went by. I was hoping that Ben Bruni would have been outside of his house to cheer or run a bit with us, but I think he was busy running his household as good as a man with a wife and three daughters (two teenagers) can.

After another major stoplight, we crossed over to Uncle Doug’s territory. Uncle Doug was not out in the rain but that didn’t stop honorary Uncle David Sears and his family to be outside and cheer alongside my mom and dad. They took the following picture which we were more than happy to photobomb as Sears yelled that our pace was amazing.

Uncle Dave and the gang

Uncle Dave and the gang, ya mon!

This, very close to our 13.1 mile marker, is where we probably should have turned around and retraced the route. Derrick and I have always said that Nashville’s marathon is one of the best first half marathons ever and yet the worst second half the way no crowds or support are there for the runners around Metro Center, and wouldn’t you know that by trying to design a race that would take us by our mutual friend’s house and community which he built that we pretty much put ourselves on a long stretch in the middle of nowhere with nobody around (Johnston Boyd was nowhere to be seen. Again, like Bruni, he was busy running a happy household of toddlers and his own business at the same time. I only call him out here because we thought about him as we ran beside his Traditions).

It was also at this point when my chest started to do something funky. Being an avid jogger, one of the best things about it for me is the ability of learning to listen to your body and what it’s trying to tell you what it needs when it needs it. That said, being able to hear what you body is saying doesn’t mean you always understand it. I know Spanish, but it was speaking something like German. After another traffic light stop, I needed to stop for a brief second to recalculate the situation. I used that time to stop Derrick and suggest that we stop for a minute’s worth of a moment of silence to think about the people we were running for that day, on and off the shirt. I’m not saying the rain let up for that minute, but there was a nice sense of peace that we took in.

As we trudged up Lover’s Lane, the airport on the right and the graveyard on the left put us in an interesting intersection of life and death and moving along. My mom was parked at one of the business parking lots on top of the hill and she noticed that I was not looking too good. I was probably feeling just as bad as I looked. She said my color was off and she actually called my dad after we left that station and said she wasn’t sure what to say or do (this, again, was a mom talking but she wasn’t too far off).

running in the middle of nowhere, Lover's Lane

running in the middle of nowhere, Lover’s Lane

I had had no problems whatsoever during the training of running good pace for 13 plus miles, but I knew at the time and know from running experience that every day is different. Some days 2 miles feel like 30 and others 20 miles feel like 2. This was gonna be one of those really long days all around and I knew it. We could either stop or keep going. I made the call to do both.

It was at this point when my stomach forced me to run into the Chic-Fil-A to use their bathroom (luckily we weren’t running on Sunday since that’s the only day I ever want to go there and it’s closed). It was rush hour lunch service and I was in and out of the bano quickly but not before someone who I went to high school saw me looking like she saw a ghost. She said, “At least one person in here is being active today.” I replied something to the effect that “I’m just trying not to stop.” I must have looked pretty bad, but the short break helped me get my spirits back up a little after hitting that first big wall.

But just because I got over that first big wall didn’t necessarily mean that all was okay. My body was still shouting at me in German or Russian or something I couldn’t understand every time Derrick and I got our pace back to normal for a few hundred yards. I knew I wasn’t going to make our goal of under 4 hours, but at that moment, weather-willing, we decided to enjoy the run and catch up at our own pace.

Chase, Mom, Jamie Gaddie, Leslie, me, and Derrick on the home stretch

Chase, Mom, Jamie Gaddie, Leslie, me, and Derrick on the home stretch

Before we knew it, we were back at Leslie’s house on Nashville Road. We took the time to soak in the picture moments together and headed on 31-W to meet up with our lone runner to join the company in that of Jared Carpenter. As you can tell from the picture below, Jared is solid as a rock (inside and out). He played football with my brother Austin at BGHS and then went on to play grown men football and become a standout defensive back at Northwestern University. He recently moved back to BG from Chicago to begin a career in athletics at WKU and has started his own tradition of running at least a 5k every weekend. He joined us at mile 20 and ended up running the most he had run at any one time in his life.

We were steady walking and jogging our way up 31-W, rain still coming down like a mist machine on low, and we darted through an empty downtown and back over to The A-Frame. This time around my mom and Alex were joined by Alex’s mom and new bride, Shkala. It was at this moment when they saw something I’m sure they’ve never seen (but something that is common for most runners of great length) … it was bloody nipple-gate. Yes, despite the fact that I attempted to prevent said issue from happening, it happened. Worse than any cramps or chest pains or skin burns from chaffing (as most runner friends of yours can attest to) is the post-race shower with nipple issues (trust me when I say it feels like a 1,000 paper cuts). Now that you have that image engrained in your thoughts, let me finish.

I remember someone saying, “You guys are doing great. Keep on moving.” I replied, “If we don’t, we won’t!” And our feet kept moving still.

My mom stopped one more time for us with Powerade and encouragement outside of the Lifeguard Press offices (formerly where Camping World first started and also where I formatted and designed my first book Adventures Inside A Bright-Eyed Sky). Jared, a lifesaver of energy and conversation during his time with us, decided to run faster all the way home from there and Derrick and I took our time (Derrick could’ve easily finished with Jared – just to note).

run Jared run!

run, Jared run!

We finished strong and the 26.2 mile marker was actually in front of my brother’s house instead of my parents’. We gave each other a high-five and then realized that we had to run to and through the second finish line because there were nephews and cousins and family waiting for us with signs and smiles.

the welcoming crew at the 2nd finish line

Drew and DP together again

Drew and DP together again

Dad by my side

Dad by my side

I can’t say that we finished under 4 hours. Our unofficial time was an awesome countdown showing 4:32:01 and I thought that was very appropriate for counting down that our real race and appreciation for life and all of those around us started after we finished running.

To pay one last homage to Adriana and our Merida connection, Derrick and I took a picture with the best cerveza in Mexico that we three amigos shared countless times with our amigos south of the border, Sol!

Salud! Two Sol(s) for Adriana's sake

Salud! Two Sol(s) for Adriana’s sake

we need limes for good luck!

we need limes for good luck!

As I write and post this, I’m still feeling an immense sense of being blessed with so many friends and family still living and not physically here today. Things are never as good or as bad as you think they are and I truly admire so many people I know constantly inspiring me to enjoy the moments and lessons and short time we have together while we have them together.

I’m already looking forward to putting another benefit together next year. Not as much for money or charity but with the goal of meeting up with loved ones to remember loved ones. Oddly enough, not one week after we completed our race, another high school friend who was from Bowling Green unexpectedly passed away at 35 years young. Heath Morris, someone I played baseball with in my youth and who always had a big smile on his face, mysteriously passed away of a widowmaker heart attack while taking a nap and slipping into the next life. I’m certain his name will be on next year’s shirt, but if you’d like to help give some love to his family in this time of need, please feel free to check out this link and share the good word – https://www.gofundme.com/9cdhcsfq.

Heath Morris standing tall

Heath Morris standing tall

Heath and Justin and Rusty will be missed but never forgotten.

Before I leave you for now, don’t worry about training majorly for next year’s event. I don’t know what we will do, but I know it won’t be another marathon. It will involve running at some point, but just know that we’ll have fun doing something extraordinary together.

Thank you for reading the above and thanks to all involved in making this very special day and event happen for Rusty and Justin and the gang. Enjoy your day today and remember to be nice to one another.

I love you!

chUck

www.eastsidestorytn.com

PS- YOU can purchase the shirts that Alex created over at The A-Frame starting now! Funds will go towards local charitable causes AND spill over into next year’s event as it comes together. You can find more information about The A-Frame by visiting it at 1229 Center Street, Bowling Green, KY or emailing its owner, Alex, at the following – jas1239@gmail.com.

 

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Duane Borba, Amy Neftzger, Rae Hering, Tom Eizonas, and Chuck Beard

Duane Borba, Amy Neftzger, Rae Hering, Tom Eizonas, and Chuck Beard

Hello everyone, and welcome to another great round of East Side Storytellin’. Similar to the 45 previous shows we’ve put together from East Side Story, we’ve come together here to get you cultured up just right in the form of a local Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Without further ado, this is East Side Storytellin’ 46.  Let us begin, again.

The first featured guest of East Side Storytellin’ 46 first began writing and publishing for various journals nearly 20 years ago (a weird fact after knowing she’s only 21 years old), but I’ll take her word for it. Often praised for her abilities with wordplay, she has published quite a few fantasy books for middle grade/young adult readers and literary pieces that sometime lean more towards the genre of magical realism. She is the author of 8 fiction books for both adults and children. Those books are The Orchards of Hope (not Orchids, despite what you hear on the recording below and 1- I can read and 2- orchids are very hopeful), The Orphanage of Miracles, All That The Dog Ever Wanted, The Ferryman, Confessions From a Moving Van, Leftover Shorts, Conversations With The Moon, and Bedtime Stories For Dogs/Cat- the last being a book that currently donates 10% of the proceeds to no-kill animal shelters via Fog Ink, the publishing company our featured guest co-founded. Some of her favorite things include traveling, books, movies, art, the Oxford comma, and gargoyles. I was very excited to introduce Amy Neftzger and her little gargoyle (Newton) too.

Newton & Amy

Newton & Amy

With Newton perched on the podium, Amy jumped right into a few excerpts from several of her books. She read from her newly released The Ferryman for a handful of minutes, describing the premise and outlining a point or two of why you should run down to East Side Story to buy a copy for yourself or friends.  Then, putting down one book for another, Amy read from both sides of the enchanting, totally original book titled Bedtime Stories for dogs/cats.  She explains the book’s concept in the recording below, but all I needed to know to listen in person was that many of the stories in the book are the same but seen through different animal narrators.  I’ll go ahead and tell you right now, I was giggling out loud and I wasn’t alone. The stories were insightful, the voices on point with what I envision my pets think about at our house, and it was just an all-around pleasant trip to take. Before I knew it, we had listened and laughed our way through the reading segment. I honestly think I could have listened to Amy read, especially from the book by dogs/cats, all night long. It was a pleasure for all.

The second featured guest of the evening was a genre enigma.  She has a sophisticated melodic sense and eclectic songwriting style, mixed in with a multitude of instruments like the piano, guitar, and accordion. Nicknamed The Shy Gemini, she calls her music Alternative Pop. I first heard about her music after her latest appearance performing at the Music in the Lobby series at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts.  I received an email from a friend not my wife who works at the Frist, suggesting she would be a perfect fit for East Side Storytellin’. After about 5 seconds of listening to her music on YouTube, I totally agreed and requested her contact information. We’re lucky to have her here tonight. A graduate of Belmont University with studies in piano and composition, she has recorded two projects to her name, most recently the 2014 release “The Shy Gemini Sessions.” She shares the stories behind the songs in her blog by the name of “Advenures of the Shy Gemini.” Off the stage, she has written and recorded for commercial spots, Nashville film festival submissions, and helping co-write for several other emerging artists. Pursuing the creative adventure and making a meaningful connection with her audience is a major key this artist tries to play every day, and the audience at hand this particular evening definitely helped her feel connected by giving a warm welcome to the one and only Rae Hering!

Rae Hering in lights and Duane Borba jamming on the side

Rae Hering in lights and Duane Borba jamming on the side

Rae was joined onstage, not by a gargoyle, but a very talented percussion friend and musician by the name of Duane Borba.  Duane had a wide variety of instruments, some strapped to his ankles. It made me think of The Music Man. Actually, truth be told and something I mentioned after the set was finished to both Rae and Amy, I visited a friend who has a 2-year-old daughter this past weekend. The parents and the daughter played the soundtrack of Mary Poppins on their record player, dancing and marching around the living room to the music, interpretative dancing to the gills. I must have had this world of thought in my head and heart during East Side Storytellin’ 46, up front and center, because I kept on imagining how magical it would be if Amy and Rae combined the stories told by dogs/cats with the fantastical chord progressions, time measurements, and sure brilliance behind the voice and sounds that Rae performed. I felt like I was at the TPAC and experiencing the most cool performance I’d ever seen there (without any acting or long intermission).

a Rae of sunshine!

a Rae of sunshine!

I’m serious, Rae really brought a lot of beautiful, insightful, and joyous words and songs with messages that I know I’m not alone, again, in wanting to thank her and Duane for sharing with us. One mantra that stayed with me long after the show was her song that mentioned the phrase “YOU are endless so don’t stop now.” You can listen to her genuine performance on the link below, or on her website. Just Google her, as the cool kids may say.

But yeah, I had the privilege of interviewing both ladies after their performance, together. It was a nice time of relaxing and conversing together about what makes them tick, who their other halves are for support at home, and what has inspired them to keep growing artistically with what they do and where they are trying to go moving forward. I’ll save the words here, and let you jump right into the edited recording so you can hear for yourself.

So, here is the edited version of East Side Storytellin’ 46. Enjoy, over and over, and share it with all of your family and friends, over and over again.

 

art by Clay Brunton, printed by Kevin Anthuis (5 Points Digital Imaging)

art by Clay Brunton, printed by Kevin Anthuis (5 Points Digital Imaging)

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Amy Neftzger, Rae Hering and Duane Borba for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

I’d also like to show much love to Tyra Neftzger and Jonathan Morse, the other halves of support for these talented ladies that helped to get this show together too. You guys rock!

You can read more from Amy Neftzger here – http://neftzger.blogspot.com

You can listen to more from Rae Hering here – http://www.raehering.com

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, for the recording and sound of the night, Clay Brunton for the amazing art print, for Kevin Anthuis at 5 Points Digital Imaging (http://5pdi.com) for printing those art prints, Otis James for my wicked cool hat, and to my lovely wife and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website, www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own Words Tab – see here –http://eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words/

But we are not finished.

The NEXT East Side Storytellin’ 47 event will be …

Date- Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

Time- 7 pm sharp (Central)

Location- Mad Donna’s (1313 Woodland Street)- http://maddonnas.com

With Sara Harvey and music by the one and only Bill Davis.  It will be our 2nd annual Halloweenish-themed show to liven up your spirits.

That’s all for the East Side Storytellin’ 46 show.  Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word.  Remember to be nice to one another out there.  Thanks and good day your way.

Much love,

mE

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Clay Brunton, Sarah Criss, Ronny Criss, Dave Wright, Chuck Beard, and Tom Eizonas

Clay Brunton, Sarah Criss, Ronny Criss, Dave Wright, Chuck Beard, and Tom Eizonas

Hello everyone, and welcome to another great round of East Side Storytellin’.  Similar to the 41 previous shows we’ve put together from East Side Story, we’ve come together here to get you cultured up just right in the form of a local Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville.  This is East Side Storytellin’ 42.

art by Clay Brunton, printed by 5 Points Digital Imaging

art by Clay Brunton, printed by 5 Points Digital Imaging

The first featured guest of the night was a wordsmith like few others.  A native of Dickson, Tennessee, a graduate of Tennessee Tech University, this driven writer is more than busy putting his education and life experiences to written page and helping to champion the cause of discovering and sharing good literature for the good reader.  Founded one year ago to the day of this show, way back on August 5th, 2013, this guy created an independent publishing company called Dig That Book Company so that he could help alleviate the growing publishing problem of good stories getting lost amidst mountains of slush piles.  On top of helping publish others, he has made time to get his wonderful works out in the world as well.  The first book he brought to East Side Story was his own collection of poems titled Riverwalkers.  I was super excited and honored to introduce this guy and welcome him into the East Side Storytellin’ alumni family.  I’m talking about the one and only Dave Wright!

photo cred- Michael Brechner

photo cred- Michael Brechner

Dave appreciated the applause, but wasted no time getting right into his words.  He briefly explained the overall concept behind his book of poems, and then he laid out how he was going to present it to the crowd on hand.  Most of the poets in the past, all of them very talented, have come to the show and read from a variety of poems that never really followed a continuum even though most flowed with common themes.  The way that Dave approached the reading from his book, he shared his art, making the absolute most of every second given, by connecting the poems to form a single, continual story arch of his book.  Growing up beside a river when I was young, the themes of river life really hit close to home and took me away to a very cool place during the reading.  It was very transcendent, to say the least.

The beautiful language, every word that was rendered for the fifteen minutes of reading, blended with the breeze that once again blew through the bamboo surrounding the patio fence outside.  The temperature had cooled to perfection, and the lighting dimmed to a setting of tranquility.  The faded bulbs hanging above us lit up the pages like a hundred lightning bugs that were killing themselves not to ever burn out, lighting the words that Dave read to enlighten our night and lives.

Dave expressed a world viewed by an imagined narrator in the form of a riverwalker.  He included striking elements of contemporary rural life on the river, mixed with epic tales inspired by tragedy and death experienced by several of the most influential creative artists from Dave’s own life, and it was all more than words amazing.  You didn’t have to grow up near a river to instantly understand and relate to everything that Dave shared.  You can listen in the link below for yourselves, but I highly suggest that you come out in person to hear Dave and all of the other guests of these shows to hear and feel it live.

That said, Dave allowed himself one final round of applause from the crowd before sitting down in the back of the crowd with family and friends to take in the music of the night.

The second set of featured guests of the show was another round of a Music City married duo.  These two met in a cigar shop where each was scheduled to perform in 2009, and have been singing together ever since.  They’ve played the legendary Bluebird Cafe several times, along with The Listening Room Cafe, Commodore Grille, and the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, among other places locally and afar.  With a flare of Country and a natural blend of folk and Americana, these two tell stories from the heart with every song they sing.  Not ones to hog any spotlight, they brought two other very talented friends to share in the moment in that of Austin “Rattlesnake” Valentine on percussion and Sam Hunter on guitar.  I was not alone while clapping my hands out, surrounded by a few fellow Frist Center family mates, to give a proper welcome to the stage for Sarah and Ronny Criss.

Ronny took the lead of the group and the moment and began right where Dave had left the energy.  It was one of the most seamless transitions between artists that I’ve experienced on the show yet.  Like Dave’s poetry, Ronny’s songs felt like one long short story that we were all meant to hear this particular evening for deeper meaning in our own lives.  Do I sound like I was moved?  Well, I was.  Each song was indeed straight from the heart, stripped down the core for the utmost emotional connectedness and meaning.  It was something to hear.

Sarah and Ronny Criss, Sam Hunter, and Austin Valentine

Sarah and Ronny Criss, Sam Hunter, and Austin Valentine

Speaking of something to hear, it was refreshing (most of all for a loving husband like Ronny) to hear Sarah take the time to tell compassionate stories of Ronny’s songwriting skills and make several specific notes of thanks out loud and in public to the solid man and loving husband he is while not on the stage.  I’m not sure if the artwork of the night inspired these wonderful moments or what, but everything just felt right and at ease.

After personally visiting the Grand Old Opry this past month, and visiting my fair share of big-named country acts in Music City while living in Nashville, I can honestly say that few are as undeniably talented as Ronny Criss- as a genuine songwriter and showman.  The rest of the band was spot on and great, but Ronny instantly fell into the group of amazing artists that I know and have seen that deserve more than double the accolades, financial success, and creative opportunities than the majority of “artists” that you see on all the billboards in town.  I hope, with his continued efforts and will to succeed, that some people in powerful places can take the time to really listen and give this guy the break he deserves.  Point being, we need more artists like Ronny Criss and Dave Wright heard by the masses.

So it was another honor for me to briefly talk candidly with the featured guests of the evening after the music was finished.  You can take a listen in the edited link below to get the picture and hear everything we talked about.  A few things that I really thought worthy of noting before you listen:  I loved the way that Sarah and Ronny talked about how they continually inspire themselves to keep the drive alive with their music, and I more than words loved the way that Dave explained the importance of having a larger number of quality readers in our creative community on top of just having a lot of quality writers contributing to the mix.  You can take a listen below for yourself.  I highly suggest you do, over and over.

So, here, without further ado, is the recording of East Side Storytellin’ 42:

 https://soundcloud.com/eastsidestorytn/sets/east-side-s

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Sarah and Ronny Criss (also featuring Austin Valentine and Sam Hunter) AND Dave Wright for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

You can read more from Dave Wright (www.digthatbook.com)

You can listen to more of Ronny Criss (www.reverbnation.com/ronnycriss)

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, for the recording and sound of the night, Clay Brunton for the art print, for Kevin at 5 Points Digital Imaging (http://5pdi.com) for printing those art prints, and to my lovely wife and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

photo cred- Michael Brechner

photo cred- Michael Brechner

Also, without forgetting a major uplifting change in fashion for the evening, I’d like to give a very special shout out to the fashion guru Otis James (http://otisjames.com) for my fantastic new trademark lid.  The new hat even has my name on it (on the inside)!  Talk about being thankful to have such creative, inspiring friends doing amazing things in the community and beyond.  Thanks, Otis, my man!

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website, www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own Words Tab – see here – http://eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words/ or HERE- http://eastsidestorytn.com/eastside-storytellin/

But we are not finished!!

The NEXT East Side Storytellin’ event will be:

Date- Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

Time- 7 pm sharp (Central)

Location- Mad Donna’s (1313 Woodland Street)- http://maddonnas.com

With poet, painter, and full-blown Renaissance man in Cory Basil (http://hereliescorybasil.com/) and a very special musical guest that you won’t want to miss.

That’s all for the East Side Storytellin’ 42 show.  Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word.  Remember to be nice to one another out there.  Thanks and good day your way.

Much love.

chuck

Nobody gives more support and love than Michael Brechner!

Nobody gives more support and love than Michael Brechner!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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East Side Storytellin’ 30: When Colour of London met the Queen of Southern Word

February 20, 2014

Hello, good evening, afternoon, or morning, and a very big, hearty, warm welcome to you ALL here to witness another great round of East Side Storytellin’.  This is the recap and recording of the 30th chapter of East Side Storytellin’, and I’m so very happy and excited to share this wonderful evening with you, but […]

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East Side Storytellin’ 29: When Carson Morton’s Mona Lisa and Allie Farris made us all smile

January 13, 2014

  Hello, good evening, morning, lunch, or siesta, and WELCOME to the 29th edition of East Side Storytellin’ – the recap, recording, and aftermath.  Right now, comfortable in your chair & computer of choice, sit back, relax, and relish in the talents of two amazing artists in their own rights here again to showcase one […]

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July 19th, 2013- When East Side Story turned the Windy into Music City and made dreams come true: a tale of 3 Matt’s, mE, Em, and Pearl Jam

July 25, 2013

 a week prior: “So let me get this straight.  You asked a friend, who happens to be the nephew of Magic Johnson, to see if Magic Johnson could ask the owner of the Chicago Cubs for tickets to see Pearl Jam play a concert at Wrigley Field?” My friend, Matt Hummer, looked at me funny. […]

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East Side Storytellin’ 12: Where writers read, sing, and eat their great uncles with a side of Red Beets for dinner outdoors.

April 22, 2013

  Tuesday, April 16th was one for the ages for myself and I know I wasn’t alone.  In fact, I would dare to say that it being the first ever East Side Storytellin’ outdoors – coupled with the fact that it was the ultimate combination of wordsmiths, local historians, and music players & appreciators – […]

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