Kentucky

Kristin Weber, Carter F. Smith, Tom Eizonas, Ali Sperry, and Chuck Beard

Thank YOU, thank YOU, thank YOU. Hello Again! Welcome to another wonderful collaboration between East Side Story and The Post. Let me be the first to officially, whole-heartedly welcome you to the recap and recording of the 117th epic edition of East Side Storytellin’! Like the 116, I repeat … 116, previous shows East Side Story has put together, we all decided to take a break from our busy schedules all over town in order to sit back and relax and get everyone cultured up just right in the form of a Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Without further ado, fulfilling the entertainment portion of your day, this is the recap and recording of East Side Storytellin’ 117. Let us begin, again.

The first featured artist of the night is someone who teaches criminal justice at MTSU (Go Blue Raiders!). He was in the US Army CID for over 22 years, serving 15 of those at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, where he and a loosely-organized group of investigators identified the growing gang problem in the early 1990’s. After the Army, he got a law degree and PhD. so you know we’re dealing with another slacker artist again, to be clear. He is a founding and still serving board member of the TN Gang Investigators Association and is a 3-time recipient of an award named for sociologists Frederic Milton Thrasher awarded by the National Gang Crime Research Center. You may recognize him from his appearances in the History Channel’s Gangland series, and you may be seeing him for the first time. Either way, it will be a pleasure. I’m talking about the extremely smart, kind, and talented Dr. Carter F. Smith.

Carter came prepared. He had a special event where he did a talk about his book a few days before East Side Storytellin’ and another one the day after. He had his notes, book, and photos to share with everyone present. Like I said, Carter was ready.

b/w photo of Monk Eastman

Carter jumped into his talk by giving the audience facts and proper context behind his research of gangs in the US military. He couldn’t have gone straight into the excerpts from his book, but he wanted us to get a clear picture of what is going on and how serious the matter is to our civilization as a whole going forward. That said, the historical context and figures he decided to talk more in depth about were truly fascinating to hear about. I knew a few of the figures, but the more unknown the characters were for me, the more impact they had had with the history of our country. I know there is at least two more book projects, whether Carter knows now or not, that he could squeeze out of these lemons.

After Carter set the scene of his book, he dove right in. He shared a few highlighted interviews he did while putting the book concept together and also while going down the wormhole of our criminal justice system and dangerous gangs located throughout our country. I instantly heard the back and forth dialogue as an old time radio show, and told this idea to Carter later for further tread on this book’s tire. Point being, I feel like Carter is only on the tip of the iceberg of this story and, although he’s done a fantastic job with absolutely everything he’s produced and shared so far, I’m hooked to hear more. You can take a listen to Carter on the recording below to hear just how on point he is with his research, writing, and delivery on this important topic.

Then, it was time for our featured music of the night. Our headlining musical guest is a Nashville-based indie artist whose songs are undeniably rooted in folk music, simple and true. Originally from Iowa and two musician parents who encouraged her to sing and create music from the time she could speak, her musical education was taught by Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Bob Dylan, and Paul Simon, among others. She moved through Syracuse University and around Chicago before being pulled to Nashville via an all-girl band called Sweetwater Rose. I know we’ll speak more about that and everything else musical and life related later, but let’s not waste any more time than we have and get this girl to sing these amazing original songs while we have her here to ourselves. Fresh off of her 2017 release of “Crooked Feelings,” her third record so far, and joined on stage by her tremendously talented friend on the fiddle, Kristin Weber, I was super excited to finally introduce the one, the only, Ali Sperry.

Ali jumped right into her song “Crooked Feelings” off the newest album. I was instantly pulled in by the lyrics “treason if you won’t fight the war” and “I quit for love!” and “I’m gonna be alright.” I thought it was the perfect transition from the dark side of life and current events explained by Carter’s work into a much more comforting and hopeful future prompted by Ali’s words, melodies, and style. I said it a few times to Tom during the performance, but Ali reminded me of a folkish version of Julie Andrew’s Mary Poppins. She was serving up the spoonfuls of sugar and it was helping us digest the real life medicine that already went down with Carter. I was feeling alive and okay.

Ali and Kristin were side by side on every note and harmony they dished to us. From the way they told the crowd to “Look at Me” with the lyric of “nobody loves you half as much as me” and “Pay attention.”, they had the entire room spellbound and in the palms of their hands. We even had two toddlers in the crowd who were recording the performance for future notes. It was very inspiring, to say the least.

Ali and Kristin ran through a solid handful of originals, from the inspiring song on hills about journeys going forward, to fictional tales and characters who Ali hopes is really real and happening somewhere in the world today, and finally wrapping up with some sad tunes and tributes to fallen friends and muses. One of the coolest moments of then night, for me, was when Ali and Kristin finished the set by covering Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ song Breakdown. You can hear it in the recording below, along with the rest of the set, but I will say that I thought it was perfect, timing and performance.

After the Tom Petty tribute ended, I was gifted with the chance to talk more about creative journeys and life passions with Ali and Carter. Both were as energetic and honest and positive as I’ve seen any duo of guests in all my time, and that says a lot since pretty much everyone I’ve had the chance to speak with is energetic, honest, and positive. You’ll hear it all in the recoding below, so I’ll save you from reading too much of my rambling post-show.

So here it is, the edited recording of East Side Storytellin’ 117, the night we featured the likes of Carter F. Smith, Ali Sperry, and Kristin Weber at The Post East on Tuesday, October 17th, 2017 at 1701 Fatherland. I’m no Yoko Ono, but I was not disappointed with a magical experience with all of these people and numbers aligning with the stars. Feel free to listen to this link and share it with all of your friends over and over again. Thank you.

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Carter & Ali (and Kristin) for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

You can read more of Carter’s writing here – www.gangsandthemilitary.com

You can listen to more of Ali’s music here – alisperry.com

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website,www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own Words Tab – see here – www.eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, my lovely wife and most talented artist in Emily Harper Beard (efharper), and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

Last, but certainly not least, I’d like to give one last shout out to Tonya and Chris for making The Post so welcoming and positively life-changing for the East Nashville community at large.

Our next show will be

East Side Storytellin’ 118, the 5th anniversary show

Tuesday, November 7th

at The Post (1701 Fatherland Street) at 7pm

reading- Dana Malone

singing- Solar Twin

That said, that’s all for East Side Storytellin’ 117 and another fabulous event at The Post with East Side Story at the helm. Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word and giving some love to all of these great Nashville artists and our creative ideas. Please remember to be nice to one another out there.

Much love,

mE

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Chuck Beard, Matt Campbell, Sarah Hays Coomer, Leah Blevins, and Tom Eizonas

Thank YOU, thank YOU, thank YOU. Hello Again! Welcome to another wonderful collaboration between East Side Story and The Post. Let me be the first to officially, whole-heartedly welcome you to the 101st epic edition of East Side Storytellin’! Like the 100, I repeat … 100, previous shows East Side Story has put together, we all decided to take a break from our busy schedules all over town in order to sit back and relax and get everyone cultured up just right in the form of a Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Without further ado, fulfilling the entertainment portion of your day, this is East Side Storytellin’ 101. Let us begin, again.

The first featured artist of the night is the first ever East Side Storytellin’ featured author who wrote a book about weight and wellness. She is a certified personal trainer, a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, a certified nutrition and wellness coach, prenatal fitness specialist, and the author of Lightness of Body and Mind: a Radical Approach to Weight and Wellness. Don’t be intimidated, we are not going to make you get up out of your seat and start doing exercises just yet. Her book is all about encouraging a healthier lifestyle for her readers, through memoirs and intimate client stories. Ready to share some of those stories and her own, it was an honor to finally have the chance to spotlight Sarah Hays Coomer.

Sarah broke her reading into two separate short stories about two very different and vulnerable clients, with Elizabeth and Cora. You can read more about both of them and more in her book, when you get a copy for yourself, but Sarah read both in a way that perfectly set up their bio’s to where the audience felt as though they had grew up alongside each person in the old neighborhood. After Sarah clarified each person’s scenario, she then dove into how both Elizabeth and Cora each attached their faults and turned their health and bodies into positive inspiration for themselves and all around them. To say that each story was moving would be an understatement of the year.

Sarah not only went into great detail about each personal case profiled, but she also delivered it in a way for each person in the crowd to instantly relate to each story and then apply those questions, answers, thoughts, and aspects of living your most healthy life and version of yourself to find true happiness for us all.  I don’t have any say in the matter, but if I was the one in charge of booking the speakers for another Women’s March in Nashville or any city, I would have to say that putting Sarah Hays Coomer as top billing would be my first and ultimate priority. She has such unique analysis, prose, and delivery that I dare you to find anyone who she can’t help for the better. We all want to be our healthiest version of what we can become. I feel fortunate to know Sarah is out there practicing what she preaches and is not out of reach for YOU or anyone you may know who could use the help. Seriously, give her a shout at her website below (and buy her books too).

Our featured music of the night is a fellow born Kentuckian (shout out to Sandy Hook!). Heavily influenced by the Appalachian Mountains, church hymns, and great country and rock leading ladies such as Emmylou Harris, Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, and Janis Joplin, this ladies distinct country/bluesy style is quite different from other leading ladies in Nashville. Since coming to Nashville, she has been featured on Acme Radio Live, landed a solid publishing deal, toured around the south and was featured on multiple festivals to date. But, on a side note, she also shares her time and efforts with cancer patients with a variety of charities. Paired with her friend on the guitar by the name of Matt Campbell, everyone in the room put their hands together for the extremely talented, Leah Blevins.

Matt was a steady melody on the guitar throughout the set and Leah was the most refreshing voice I’ve ever heard in Nashville. I can’t say enough superlatives about Leah’s voice and writing. She is a natural born poet with the chops of a reincarnated every female I described in the bio (Janis, Emmylou, and Loretta). I’m being totally serious here. A lot of people describe themselves as similar to their heroes, but this is one case where it not only speaks to the truth of the matter but it also says everything about where this young star is on her journey. If Leah is this good now, I can only imagine and feel fortunate to follow the rest of her creative journey for decades to come.

Leah sang bout mexican restaurants, magnolias, little birds, and running to and from things, but each song has about a 100 layers of beauty, wonder, and discovery mixed into the lot. Beneath the surface of her song lyrics and melodies lies a magical depth of ideas to explore and honesty to feel where few artists grant access on the regular or at all. I was honored to be in the crowd and to experience everything these great artists were sharing.

And speaking of sharing, I was yet again afforded the wonderful chance to ask these two featured artists more about their artistic growth, creative journeys, and what makes them continue to tick. They didn’t disappoint in their answers or their grace. For a rainy Tuesday in February that has had a strange dynamic with weather and a chaotic world for all, this musical set and reading performance was spot on medicine for all who are willing to listen to themselves and others for help. Not to mention, Leah and Matt and Sarah are some of the most humble and flat out nice artists I’ve ever been around. The combination will make you sick with hope. Point being, these ladies are good. Real good.

So here it is, the edited recording of East Side Storytellin’ 101 that featured Sarah Hays Coomer and Leah Blevins (with Matt Campbell) at The Post East on Tuesday, February 21, 2017. Feel free to enjoy this link and share it with one and all over and over again. You’re welcome.

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Sarah and Leah for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

You can read more of Sarah’s writing here – www.strengthoutsidein.com

You can listen to more of Leah’s music here – www.leahblevinsmusic.com

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website,www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own Words Tab – see here – www.eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, my lovely wife and most talented artist in Emily Harper Beard (efharper), and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

I’d also like to show much love to Clay Brunton for the beautiful artwork online to promote the show.

Last, but certainly not least, I’d like to give one last shout out to Tonya and Chris for making The Post so welcoming and positively life-changing for the East Nashville community at large.

Our next show will be

East Side Storytellin’ 102

Tuesday, March 7th

at The Post (1701 Fatherland Street) at 7pm

reading- Larry Kenneth Alexander (www.smokemirrorandchains.com)

singing- Rayvon Pettis (www.rayvonpettis.com

That said, that’s all for East Side Storytellin’ 101 and another fabulous event at The Post with East Side Story at the helm. Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word and giving some love to all of these great Nashville artists and our creative ideas. Please remember to be nice to one another out there.

Much love,

mE

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Evidence that we finished the race together from the start of this post so you and my mom won't worry any longer :)

Evidence that we finished the race together from the start of this post so you and my mom won’t worry any longer 🙂

On the morning of Saturday, November 28th, 2015, when most people in their right minds were spending the Saturday after Thanksgiving with family and loved ones, surrounding themselves with extra servings of turkey leftovers and football games as far as their hungry eyes could see, my good friend Derrick Pierce and I ran a marathon in my hometown of Bowling Green, Kentucky. Before you get this post twisted, this is not a shaming post to inspire you to get off the couch or to discourage the act of appreciating the remnants of Thanksgiving as long as you can. I love both of those ideas much more than I do training and running a marathon, especially a 2-person marathon without an official time or road closures or medals or bib numbers or photo finishes. This is a post of remembering our loved ones.

Like stretching our muscles before the big run, this race has a brief story before the story that clarifies the situation and sets the mood. On August 29th, I received the following email from the husband of another close friend, Adriana Melnyk Brandt:

Adriana’s father Rusty has been in hospice at home for a little over a week.  He passed away this afternoon.

In his final days he was comforted by Joy, Adriana, and other friends and family members and was able to listen to a playlist of the final Grateful Dead shows from earlier this month, which brought him comfort. Rusty was a lifelong Deadhead amongst his many amazing skills and sense of humor.  I will personally miss him dearly and am forever indebted to him for his life advice, and letting me marry his daughter.

They also played the following concert, which Rusty saw when he was in college in upstate NY. We all listened to it together as a family on our back porch last summer, before we moved to Utah.  He may or may not have, in his own words, “dropped acid and eaten a fist-full of reds and blues” while at this show. The show is a great one (unaided) and we ask that you keep Rusty, Joy, and Adriana in your thoughts while you listen to it.

The show ends with a jam of Saint Stephen (Rusty’s favorite song) / Not Fade Way / Goin’ Down the Road Feeling Bad / Not Fade Away / Turn on Your Lovelight.  Even if you don’t know the music, the titles alone are fitting. The jam is even preceded by Big Railroad Blues (Rusty worked for the railroad for many years before retiring in 2012).

Rusty Melnyk displaying his old school, dreamy, pensive looks which Adriana said was very much him his entire life.

Rusty Melnyk displaying his old school, dreamy, pensive looks which Adriana said was very much him his entire life.

Rusty Melnyk snoozing after another successful family Thanksgiving in 2013 (I told you this isn't a post about shaming people on couches on Thanksgiving!)

Rusty Melnyk snoozing after another successful family Thanksgiving in 2013 (I told you this isn’t a post about shaming people on couches on Thanksgiving!)

Upon receiving the email, I was heartbroken for Adriana. I cannot fathom losing my father so I immediately reached out to her to talk and catch up but that didn’t happen. Understandably, she was in a place where she needed time to let it all sink in. I respected her space and told her to let me know when she was able to talk. I felt even worse about things because I hadn’t talked with Adriana in a very long time. She had moved out to Utah in the past year, received her doctorate, and had also taken up a love of ultra marathon running due to her love of finishing everything she starts and a deep appreciation for the outdoors and wondrous landscapes of the West.

Later that same day of receiving the email about Adriana’s dad, I was in a text message with several other mutual friends of Adriana and Derrick when it dawned on me that I had not seen Derrick since he and I ran the Music City Marathon in Nashville back in 2009. Soon after that race, Derrick moved to Arkansas to start up his own successful optometry practice and has been busy ever since in his own world. Hearing the news that Derrick had gone through a divorce not too long ago without me knowing about it, I was feeling two-for-two of being a real shitty friend in time of need for two people I deeply care about and love very much.

To preface this preface = Adriana and Derrick and I first became the closest of friends when we all lived and studied abroad together in the spring of 2001 in Merida, Mexico through a program offered by Centre College. There are too many stories to tell about those adventures and the ones that followed so I’ll leave that for another post altogether.

Centre in Mexico 2kuno = Semana Santa Easter Festival in Antigua, Guatemala 2001. Adriana and Derrick and me in the middle with other amigos

Centre in Mexico 2kuno = Semana Santa Easter Festival in Antigua, Guatemala 2001. (Pictured from left to right: Julia Muchard, Prescott Hoffman (God rest his soul), TJ Brown, Lucas Joyner, Adriana, mE in the back, Derrick, and Sam Beiting.

Another shot from Spring Break 2001 on the weeklong adventure in Mexico and Guatemala. This is me, Derrick, Adriana, Sam, Julia, Lucas, TJ (tejota), and Prescott (God rest his soul, gone too early in a tragic accident soon after graduation).

Another shot from Spring Break 2001 in a forest in Palenque, Chiapas during our weeklong adventure in Mexico and Guatemala. This is mE on the tree, Derrick, Adriana, Sam Beiting, Julia Muchard, Lucas Joyner, TJ Brown (tejota), and Prescott Hoffman (God rest his soul, gone too early in a tragic accident soon after graduation).

I texted Derrick to see if he’d like to catch up via a phone call that very evening and he promptly answered my call. He assured me that all was well in his world, professionally and personally, and then I brought up the news and idea I had to honor Adriana and her family. Here is the brief phone conversation:

Me: Hey, do you still run a lot?

Derrick: Well, I have run a few marathons this year already but I’m definitely taking a break until the fall.

Me: Derrick, you do realize that it’s August and you said you’ve ran a few marathons this year and it’s almost fall, right? You could have just said yes.

Derrick: True. What do you have in mind, chizzucles?

Me: Well, are you coming back to Kentucky for the holidays at all?

Derrick: I’ll definitely be in for Thanksgiving.

Me: Okay. Let me talk to Adriana and then get back to you.

Derrick: Deal. I’m down for whatever.

I emailed Adriana right back after chewing the fat with Derrick and she said that she would only be back East for Christmas. I had to tell her that that would not be good timing for the idea to happen on my end and we’d have to stick to Thanksgiving without her physically being present because I couldn’t train for my idea and then not follow through with the race if my wife went into labor and had our first child around Christmas (talk about an announcement on the fly within close circles – we are due on December 30th but it looks like it will come early – we don’t know what we are having but we know it’s – shim’s – a giant). Adriana totally understood and was happy just to be in the loop.

So, here was the initial idea before the run:

I would map out a race route around Bowling Green, Kentucky that would start and end at my parents’ home on Garvin Lane. It would feature spots along the route that not only highlighted past memories and current homes of family and friends where they could set up mini-cheer/aid stations for us, but it would also let Derrick get a good view of everything Bowling Green has to appreciate = check.

I enlisted my good friend Alex Smith, a great artist and screen printer who just opened a new business in downtown BG called The A-Frame, to make special t-shirts to commemorate the race and all involved = check.

Derrick sent me two training schedules. He sent the second one saying this one is a bit more difficult than the first if you aren’t skeered … knowing full well that I would do the second one after that message. Derrick can run a marathon in 3.5 hours so it would be the perfect set-up for me to finally run one in under 4 (even if 3:59:59). After all, we weren’t running to qualify for any other races in the near future.

With the training and race in the books, and a few family members and friends lined up to make an appearance along the route to help us on the day of the run, all was set for another epic adventure to be had together. Then tragedy struck again.

Two weeks on the dot from the race day, a guy I once knew in high school, Justin Griffin, fell to his death on the other side of the world. Justin was a Kentucky state champion runner and classmate at Bowling Green Senior High School and someone who always drove others to smile more, run faster, and be nicer to one another. He was a driven soul who inspired others to expect more out of themselves as well. Since our time together in high school, Justin went on to become an award-winning professional designer & builder and world-renowned climber and father of his first and only baby this past year. He was at the tail end of a few weeks of volunteering on a special project in Nepal and also marking a new historic climbing route when he slipped. You can read all about his final adventure here – www.climbing.com/news/tragedy-follows-first-ascent-in-nepal/.

Justin Griffin- picture and words to read on this link by his friend Conrad Anker- https://www.instagram.com/p/-jTucnMFpG/

Justin Griffin- picture and words to read on this link by his friend Conrad Anker- https://www.instagram.com/p/-jTucnMFpG/

The news of Justin’s passing hit me extremely hard. The fact that he was doing something he loved dearly instead of a traditional career path and also that he was a fairly new father put some major life things in perspective for me just when I needed them. Also, my heart went out to his younger sister, Lane, who I was closer to than Justin but hadn’t talked to in a handful of years beyond checking in with her on Facebook here and there. Regardless, she is someone I still care deeply about and have since we first became friends way back when. Side note, Lane ended up attending Centre College as well as Bowling Green Senior High School with me. She’s way smarter than me though. Side side note, I found out that in this time of family adversity, Lane was expecting the birth of her second child at any minute too (I’m very happy to report that Juniper Justin Valiante was born four days post-BG race and everyone is happy and healthy!).

I called Alex and asked if he could make a name addition to the t-shirt design he was creating secretively in his art studio. I had emailed Alex the original email from Adriana highlighted above about her father and his love of the Grateful Dead and asked that he come up with something original for the race as he might for his custom concert t-shirts. I told him that the race name was going to be “Grateful 4 the Dead Run” and he loved it. I asked that he include the name of Adriana’s dad under the artwork and also Justin’s as well.

Alex did me one better. The day before the run, he added “1st annual” and I said that that was a brilliant idea so that we could do something every year from now on going forward to honor our friends and friends of friends who pass away in the year in between (sort of like the memorandum at the Oscars). It wouldn’t have to be something huge, like a marathon, or to raise tons of money, but it would be something very near and dear to all those who wish to participate.

"Grateful 4 the Dead run" t-shirt designed and made by Alex Smith

“The 1st Annual Grateful 4 the Dead Run” t-shirt designed and printed by Alex Smith. If you want one, email Alex at jas1239@gmail.com or visit The A-Frame at 1229 Center Street in Bowling Green today!

Fast-forward to the morning of Saturday, November 28th, and I’m fully dressed and ready to run and waiting for Derrick to show up at my parent’s house. I heard the dogs barking and I walked outside to see Derrick pretty much matching me from head to toe without planning our running gear. I instantly thought of my good friend Michael Brechner and almost was overcome with emotions on top of the laughing Derrick and I were doing when seeing each other for the first time in 5 years. Michael is one of the coolest and nicest people I have ever met. He works with my wife at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts and is currently battling cancer via chemo treatment for the second time in just over a year. Prayers his way are welcome, but the thing that distinctly made me think of Michael in terms of our running attire was that he always takes pictures of co-workers or friends who dress alike on accident and posts them online and in his office. He calls them twinkies, I believe.

I think I needed Michael’s positivity and spirit and Derrick’s enthusiasm to get going that specific morning because it was raining something steady. Derrick had packed for all sorts of weather and even planned on possibly canceling the run outdoors if it rained a flood. I told him there was no way I could do 26.2 miles on a treadmill and we took off into the mist without further questions.

We seemed to have all of life’s answers with the wind at our backs. By the end of the first mile at the turn off of Garvin Lane, we had run an amazing 8-minute mile (we only needed to maintain around a 9-minute pace for time goal) and I probably talked for the entire 8 minutes, trying to fit in 5 years of updates to get on the same page with Derrick. Both of those things would come back to haunt me.

The rain wasn’t too much to handle and it wasn’t too cold either. I believe the slow, consistent drizzle helped us both slow down into a more natural pace to weather the route and the budding storm looming ahead. Our first turns around old neighborhoods took us right by my childhood education of St. Joseph Catholic School. I could almost hear Coach Gorman telling me to sprint up the steps faster or making some joke that also served as inspiration. And speaking of Coach Gorman, we ran past his offices, turning at the Bowling Green Hot Rods minor league baseball park and headed towards our first aid station, The A-Frame.

My mom was waiting for us at The A-Frame, holding some water and Powerade and her camera phone, as my dad and Alex were holding court. Alex told us that he had the shirts printed and ready and I told him I’d take a look at them when we returned on the 2nd pass at around 22 miles. Derrick and I slowed but not to a stop (at least I didn’t stop while Derrick found our first of several outdoor restrooms). We kept moving along.

Derrick scoping out our next bathroom location and me getting love from Alex Smith at The A-Frame

We circled Western Kentucky University’s campus off of Kentucky Avenue, past the big football stadium where family past and present have played (Go Tops!), and then took a right, appropriately, on Nashville Road to the next station. Out in front of my cousin’s childhood home was my cousin Leslie and her growing family with tons of signs and water and Powerade and smiles in the pouring rain. Anyone who has run at all knows just how much each and every ounce of positivity goes a long way. Derrick and I were feeling good about our run at this point, but it all helped.

Chase and Jamie Gaddie showing us some original signage

Dad with the much needed Powerade

Dad with the much needed Powerade

We took a left and a left and then ran by Uncle Mike’s humble abode. At Mike’s house, my mom was the solo cheerleader. She had said she was game for keeping up with us along the way (probably 51% or more out of concern and 49% or less out of cheering for us, but she’s a mom and that’s what they do, right?) but we didn’t fully know until she was alone that she was down to be our traveling support team throughout. Again, it meant the world to both of us.

Through our first major traffic light, we crossed into the hood of Bent Tree right after passing by Grandmother Beard’s house. Grandmother (because if you know Betty Jo at all then you already know her name is Grandmother) was accompanied by my mom and dad and brother Austin and Taylor and my aunt Page. That was the first time I had to use nature’s restroom before the crowd (hence, the solo pictures below).

Derrick keeping the pace while I stepped to the side for a sec

Derrick keeping the pace while I stepped to the side for a sec

a little lighter and back on track

a little lighter and back on track

the cheering squad on Euclid

the cheering squad at Grandmother’s

We weaved in and around several blocks in Bent Tree and spit out near my brother Drew’s house a few hoods over. We somehow missed my mom and Taylor and nobody was at Drew’s yard when we went by. I was hoping that Ben Bruni would have been outside of his house to cheer or run a bit with us, but I think he was busy running his household as good as a man with a wife and three daughters (two teenagers) can.

After another major stoplight, we crossed over to Uncle Doug’s territory. Uncle Doug was not out in the rain but that didn’t stop honorary Uncle David Sears and his family to be outside and cheer alongside my mom and dad. They took the following picture which we were more than happy to photobomb as Sears yelled that our pace was amazing.

Uncle Dave and the gang

Uncle Dave and the gang, ya mon!

This, very close to our 13.1 mile marker, is where we probably should have turned around and retraced the route. Derrick and I have always said that Nashville’s marathon is one of the best first half marathons ever and yet the worst second half the way no crowds or support are there for the runners around Metro Center, and wouldn’t you know that by trying to design a race that would take us by our mutual friend’s house and community which he built that we pretty much put ourselves on a long stretch in the middle of nowhere with nobody around (Johnston Boyd was nowhere to be seen. Again, like Bruni, he was busy running a happy household of toddlers and his own business at the same time. I only call him out here because we thought about him as we ran beside his Traditions).

It was also at this point when my chest started to do something funky. Being an avid jogger, one of the best things about it for me is the ability of learning to listen to your body and what it’s trying to tell you what it needs when it needs it. That said, being able to hear what you body is saying doesn’t mean you always understand it. I know Spanish, but it was speaking something like German. After another traffic light stop, I needed to stop for a brief second to recalculate the situation. I used that time to stop Derrick and suggest that we stop for a minute’s worth of a moment of silence to think about the people we were running for that day, on and off the shirt. I’m not saying the rain let up for that minute, but there was a nice sense of peace that we took in.

As we trudged up Lover’s Lane, the airport on the right and the graveyard on the left put us in an interesting intersection of life and death and moving along. My mom was parked at one of the business parking lots on top of the hill and she noticed that I was not looking too good. I was probably feeling just as bad as I looked. She said my color was off and she actually called my dad after we left that station and said she wasn’t sure what to say or do (this, again, was a mom talking but she wasn’t too far off).

running in the middle of nowhere, Lover's Lane

running in the middle of nowhere, Lover’s Lane

I had had no problems whatsoever during the training of running good pace for 13 plus miles, but I knew at the time and know from running experience that every day is different. Some days 2 miles feel like 30 and others 20 miles feel like 2. This was gonna be one of those really long days all around and I knew it. We could either stop or keep going. I made the call to do both.

It was at this point when my stomach forced me to run into the Chic-Fil-A to use their bathroom (luckily we weren’t running on Sunday since that’s the only day I ever want to go there and it’s closed). It was rush hour lunch service and I was in and out of the bano quickly but not before someone who I went to high school saw me looking like she saw a ghost. She said, “At least one person in here is being active today.” I replied something to the effect that “I’m just trying not to stop.” I must have looked pretty bad, but the short break helped me get my spirits back up a little after hitting that first big wall.

But just because I got over that first big wall didn’t necessarily mean that all was okay. My body was still shouting at me in German or Russian or something I couldn’t understand every time Derrick and I got our pace back to normal for a few hundred yards. I knew I wasn’t going to make our goal of under 4 hours, but at that moment, weather-willing, we decided to enjoy the run and catch up at our own pace.

Chase, Mom, Jamie Gaddie, Leslie, me, and Derrick on the home stretch

Chase, Mom, Jamie Gaddie, Leslie, me, and Derrick on the home stretch

Before we knew it, we were back at Leslie’s house on Nashville Road. We took the time to soak in the picture moments together and headed on 31-W to meet up with our lone runner to join the company in that of Jared Carpenter. As you can tell from the picture below, Jared is solid as a rock (inside and out). He played football with my brother Austin at BGHS and then went on to play grown men football and become a standout defensive back at Northwestern University. He recently moved back to BG from Chicago to begin a career in athletics at WKU and has started his own tradition of running at least a 5k every weekend. He joined us at mile 20 and ended up running the most he had run at any one time in his life.

We were steady walking and jogging our way up 31-W, rain still coming down like a mist machine on low, and we darted through an empty downtown and back over to The A-Frame. This time around my mom and Alex were joined by Alex’s mom and new bride, Shkala. It was at this moment when they saw something I’m sure they’ve never seen (but something that is common for most runners of great length) … it was bloody nipple-gate. Yes, despite the fact that I attempted to prevent said issue from happening, it happened. Worse than any cramps or chest pains or skin burns from chaffing (as most runner friends of yours can attest to) is the post-race shower with nipple issues (trust me when I say it feels like a 1,000 paper cuts). Now that you have that image engrained in your thoughts, let me finish.

I remember someone saying, “You guys are doing great. Keep on moving.” I replied, “If we don’t, we won’t!” And our feet kept moving still.

My mom stopped one more time for us with Powerade and encouragement outside of the Lifeguard Press offices (formerly where Camping World first started and also where I formatted and designed my first book Adventures Inside A Bright-Eyed Sky). Jared, a lifesaver of energy and conversation during his time with us, decided to run faster all the way home from there and Derrick and I took our time (Derrick could’ve easily finished with Jared – just to note).

run Jared run!

run, Jared run!

We finished strong and the 26.2 mile marker was actually in front of my brother’s house instead of my parents’. We gave each other a high-five and then realized that we had to run to and through the second finish line because there were nephews and cousins and family waiting for us with signs and smiles.

the welcoming crew at the 2nd finish line

Drew and DP together again

Drew and DP together again

Dad by my side

Dad by my side

I can’t say that we finished under 4 hours. Our unofficial time was an awesome countdown showing 4:32:01 and I thought that was very appropriate for counting down that our real race and appreciation for life and all of those around us started after we finished running.

To pay one last homage to Adriana and our Merida connection, Derrick and I took a picture with the best cerveza in Mexico that we three amigos shared countless times with our amigos south of the border, Sol!

Salud! Two Sol(s) for Adriana's sake

Salud! Two Sol(s) for Adriana’s sake

we need limes for good luck!

we need limes for good luck!

As I write and post this, I’m still feeling an immense sense of being blessed with so many friends and family still living and not physically here today. Things are never as good or as bad as you think they are and I truly admire so many people I know constantly inspiring me to enjoy the moments and lessons and short time we have together while we have them together.

I’m already looking forward to putting another benefit together next year. Not as much for money or charity but with the goal of meeting up with loved ones to remember loved ones. Oddly enough, not one week after we completed our race, another high school friend who was from Bowling Green unexpectedly passed away at 35 years young. Heath Morris, someone I played baseball with in my youth and who always had a big smile on his face, mysteriously passed away of a widowmaker heart attack while taking a nap and slipping into the next life. I’m certain his name will be on next year’s shirt, but if you’d like to help give some love to his family in this time of need, please feel free to check out this link and share the good word – https://www.gofundme.com/9cdhcsfq.

Heath Morris standing tall

Heath Morris standing tall

Heath and Justin and Rusty will be missed but never forgotten.

Before I leave you for now, don’t worry about training majorly for next year’s event. I don’t know what we will do, but I know it won’t be another marathon. It will involve running at some point, but just know that we’ll have fun doing something extraordinary together.

Thank you for reading the above and thanks to all involved in making this very special day and event happen for Rusty and Justin and the gang. Enjoy your day today and remember to be nice to one another.

I love you!

chUck

www.eastsidestorytn.com

PS- YOU can purchase the shirts that Alex created over at The A-Frame starting now! Funds will go towards local charitable causes AND spill over into next year’s event as it comes together. You can find more information about The A-Frame by visiting it at 1229 Center Street, Bowling Green, KY or emailing its owner, Alex, at the following – jas1239@gmail.com.

 

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Jewly Hight, Angaleena Presley, Chuck Beard, and Tom Eizonas.

Jewly Hight, Angaleena Presley, Chuck Beard, and Tom Eizonas.

Thank YOU for visiting this page, hello, and welcome to another fun edition of East Side Storytellin’. You have found yourself smack dab in a reflection of a big celebration for quite the milestone. This is our 50th show. I repeat. This is our 50th show! Just 50 more until 100 and possible syndication, and 49 more than our first show, if my math is right, right? Either way you look at it, welcome to the 50th episode. Like the 49 previous shows we’ve put together from East Side Story, we’ve all arrived at this spot, here and now, to get y’all cultured up just right in the form of a Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Without further ado, this is the recap and recording for East Side Storytellin’ 50. Let us begin, again.

The first featured guest of this evening was someone who has written about popular music for more than a dozen outlets- including American Songwriter, Relix, Nashville Public Radio, the Nashville Scene, Paste, No Depression, and more than six others. In a town flooded by talented songwriters, this lady is someone that bridges the stories of the singers and the people they are when not performing behind the microphone to the fans and everyone listening to appreciate the entire picture surrounding the music industry and why it is still so special for this town and in general. Born in North Carolina and raised in Florida, she earned a master’s degree from Vanderbilt Divinity School. So, basically, you would be correct in thinking that this lady puts a lot of soul and southern goodness into all of her prose when she’s writing about music, the meaning of things, and pretty much anything she sets her heart on penning. Author of her debut book, “Right by Her Roots: Americana Women and Their Songs” (of which you can purchase over at East Side Story whenever you fancy) I was thrilled to finally get this writer on the show and to introduce the always awesome Miss Jewly Hight.

50 reading far

Jewly took to the stage in some killer pink boots and a copy of her book and other writings. She thanked the crowd and dove right into reading from the ending of her first book. She read from a portion that wonderfully explained the core of the stories hat made up the “Roots” project. The next excerpt, with her book aside, came from a story that Jewly wrote and was featured in an issue of Oxford American last year. Oddly enough, and coincidentally without probably know about the events at Mad Donna’s after the conclusion of our show, it was about Drag Queens and music and parties. I know that Tom and I weren’t the only ones in the crowd who took delight in the theme amidst our surroundings. Needless to say, it was perfect and fitting beyond words.

Jewly finished her reading by sharing bits and pieces from an interview that she did with the featured musician of the night in a prior gig. It was a perfect introduction to the musical portion of the show and surreal, at the same time, for me knowing that we would have an interview sandwich of sorts for the evening for a fun change to the usual format. Either way, Jewly was as thoughtful and insightful delivering her exquisite prose as her writing itself. I’m a big fan of her writing and you should too. Come to the store and buy her book, for starters … like NOW!

Now, back to the show, the featured music of the night kept the blue streak alive. The second featured artist in a row who was born in my own bluegrass state of Kentucky, this girl made her grand debut in a place called Beauty, Kentucky (I had to look it up on a map too). She’d like for you to know that she is a direct descendent of the original feuding McCoys, a graduate of both the school of hard knocks and college, a former cashier at both Wal-Mart and Winn-Dixie, and is also known from time to time as a member of the Platinum-selling group Pistol Annies (alongside Miranda Lambert and Ashley Monroe). Hot off her recent release of her much-anticipated debut album, called “American Middle Class,” everyone erupted in applause for the one, the only, Angaleena Presley.

Angaleena jumped right into the role she says is what she was born to do, singer-songwriter extraordinaire. She also went on to say that she feels she was born to write songs and perform them because she isn’t good at anything else, but nobody believed her on that note. That said, it was quite refreshing for everyone to here Angaleena go into great introspective depth for each song and really share the details, the personal backstory details at that, for every song she sang.

When she talked about her lovely hometown of Beauty, not to be confused with the lovely town of Lovely, KY, I was totally blown away with the description details and wordsmithing she angled for some of the unique lyrics of “Dry County Blues.”  It was the first time in my life that I had ever heard the term “pillbilly,” but I understood exactly what she was relaying. That’s one of the best things, one best thing of many, about Angaleena and how she performed (as she always does, how Jewly later told me too). She paints a perfect picture of where she came from and how she grew up (not only detailing the location, setting, and specific characters, but also how she perceived everything as it happened), but the way she sings from her heart with immense skill and heart is easily felt by anyone listening with a heartbeat (even the drunk sailor in the background, aka Captain Morgan, of whom you can hear in the recording a time or two showing his love and Angaleena giving some right back).  I’m telling you, it was an all-around, storytelling’ session like few others. My words can’t fully justify what everyone there witnessed. It was that special.

After Angaleena sang her fair share of songs, including one from the days of the Pistol Annies, I was fortunate yet again to have the featured guests join me on stage for a quick Q & A. As you can listen below in the link of the show, it turned into quite the contest to see who could answer each question with the most entertainment value and honesty (or two shades of to the left of honesty in some cases to make the story just that much better of an answer in an attempt to win that round). Basically, Mark Twain would have been proud and thoroughly enjoyed the charisma and character and content that both of our featured guests of East Side Storytellin’ 50 provided to everyone for a very special night.

Angaleena must have won this round with an answer that made me laugh out loud and rolled Jewly to her side #winning

With all of these words above us, I’d now like to present to you the golden opportunity to listen to the edited version of East Side Storytellin’ 50. You can listen to it countless times by just re-clicking it, over and over, and you can share it with as many people on and off-line as humanly possible. In fact, why don’t you share it with as many people as you can and let me know how many humanly possible is. There might be a prize for the winner. Either way, enjoy this prized link right here and now:

art by Clay Brunton, printed by Kevin Anthuis at 5 Points Digital Imaging

art by Clay Brunton, printed by Kevin Anthuis at 5 Points Digital Imaging

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Jewly Hight and Angaleena Presley for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

You can read more from Jewly Hight here – www.twitter.com/rightbyherroots

You can listen to more from Angaleena Presley here – http://www.angaleenapresley.com

 

I’d also like to show much love to Clay Brunton for the beautiful artwork for the prints made by Kevin Anthuis at 5 Points Digital Imaging (http://5pdi.com) to celebrate tonight’s show.

 

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, Otis James for my wicked cool hat, my lovely wife and most talented artist in Emily Harper Beard (efharper), and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website, www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own Words Tab – see here –http://eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words/

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But we are not finished.

The NEXT East Side Storytellin’ event will be …

EAST SIDE STORYTELLIN’ 51

TUESDAY, December 16th, 2014

Time- 7 pm sharp (Central)

Location- Mad Donna’s (1313 Woodland Street)-http://maddonnas.com

Need information or details about Mad Donna’s, call  615-226-1617. Otherwise, it is first come, first available seats.

Who will be featured- poet Tiana Clark (www.tianaclark.com) and music by Deli (www.facebook.com/delicolortempo)

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That’s all for the East Side Storytellin’ 50 show. I repeat. That’s it for East Side Storytellin’ 50! Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word. Remember to be nice to one another out there. Thanks and good day your way.

Much love,

mE

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Tom Eizonas, Alissa Moreno, Chuck Beard, Alecia Whitaker, and (DR.) Josh Charles

Tom Eizonas, Alissa Moreno, Chuck Beard, Alecia Whitaker, and (DR.) Josh Charles

Thank YOU, hello, and welcome to another fun East Side Storytellin’. If you’ve been living in a cave, good for you … you’ve probably missed the fact that we just rounded out 2 years and 48 other East Side Storytellin’ shows up to this point. Cave or not, welcome to the 49th episode. Like the 48 previous shows we’ve put together from East Side Story, we’ve all arrived at this spot, here and now, to get y’all cultured up just right in the form of a writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Unlike the previous 48, the featured author in this round is not from or living in Nashville at the moment. You can ask her after the show via email at her website as to why she hasn’t decided to move here already if you’d like. It might help if you drop by East Side Story and buy her book first.

Before I get started, I know I’ll get to it more in detail in the recording of the show below, but I was first introduced to the concept of the story and the theme of this particular show almost two years ago in a graduate level creative fiction workshop while attending the School of Letters at the University of the South at Sewanee. East Side Storytellin’ 17 alumnus (http://eastsidestorytn.com/east-side-storytellin-17-where-virginia-was-for-lovers-of-great-literature-and-music-moved-to-tn-alike/), published author, and newly married woman in Kathryn Williams, handed our class the rough draft of a concept that would later become the beginning of a successful publishing series in the making. This past summer, with the series in full effect, Kathryn suggested that I have tonight’s artists on the bill together because they are very talented in their own rights but also because their art was brought together for said unique project. Like Kathryn did for her man, I said yes and these girls said yes and now we’re all here with or without bells on to tell you the next part of the story. Thanks be to Kathryn. Without further ado, this is East Side Storytellin’ 49. Let us begin, again.

The first featured guest of the night also hails from the hallowed ground of the bluegrass state of Kentucky. A graduate of UK in Theatre and Advertising, writing was never too far behind in her overall passions after she won the Soil Conservation Essay contest in the 4th grade, selected as a Governor’s School of the Arts student in Creative Writing in the 10th grade, and then a Top Ten Finalist in the US Southeast Region for the Ten Minute Playwriting competition at James Madison University. Her personal essays have been published in the anthology Blink: Fiction in the Blink of an Eye, several times in Underwired Magazine, and her first novel and proudest artistic accomplishment is appropriately called The Queen of Kentucky. She loves to make author appearances in schools (making several stops in Kentucky before heading to Music City in fact), she’s been on The Ellen DeGeneres Show several times, even dropping a spot as a contestant on the TV gameshow Deal or No Deal, but I’m pretty sure she was most excited about being at East Side Storytellin’ and sharing her stories in Nashville … I’m pretty sure. For this special occasion, she planned to introduce you to Wildflower, the first novel in her three book series about a young girl’s rise to country music stardom, released this year. The new setting indoors and downstairs at Mad Donna’s was filled with happy faces that joyfully welcomed the Kentucky born and New York City livin’ writer to the stage. They were pumped to see and hear from the featured author, Alecia Whitaker.

Alecia took to the microphone like a professional. She reminded me of several other featured authors that graced our stage that utilized the full range of her voice and accents to vocalize the conversations from the excerpts that she chose to read from for the evening. It was fascinating actually. Her energy, paired with enthusiasm for the main character called Bird and the musical journey that she went on throughout the book, was something awesome. Without having read the book yet, I was wondering if Alecia was going to sing any songs that were in the book. She did. It made several laugh when Alecia called herself out for being a writer and not a singer, after the fact, but it was honest and innocent and great for the experience. In fact, she called out the crowd to participate as the fictional crowd in a particular scene she read in the story and it really made the story pop off the pages into reality for all to enjoy for ourselves. After several sections of reading, all I can say (and you can tell from the recording below) is that it was a real treat to have Alecia visit and talk about the amazing book and book series she was helping to create.

Before we knew it, it was time for the author to sit back down with her amazing son and let the music come alive from the pages of the book. This project was the treat that kept on giving.

The featured music of the night was someone you have already heard from before, whether you know it yet or not. Born on a Navajo Indian Reservation in New Mexico to two teachers and raised in creative culture of Albuquerque and Santa Fe, she now calls Nashville one of her homes as she is renowned for her piano, vocal, and songwriting talents near and far. She wrote the Grammy nominated and CMT Video of the Year song Every Day for Rascal Flatts. Her music has been featured on Laguna Beach, The Hills, How I Met Your Mother, Guiding Light, Days of Our Lives, and used for promotion on shows like Army Wives and Grey’s Anatomy, on top of countless others. She normally splits her time performing between Nashville and LA in places like the Grand Ole Opry, Bluebird Cafe, House of Blues, The Viper Room, and The Hotel Cafe, to name a few in both cities, but, once again, I’m pretty sure that she was most excited about being at Mad Donna’s this special night and sharing her songs and stories with you … I’m pretty sure. I was not alone in giving a raucous ovation for the likes of Alissa Moreno.

Alissa was cold, at first, and literally cold enough beside the window that she had to put her jacket back on to perform at the level was comfortable. She quickly warmed up to the stage and the crowd at hand. She dove right into several emotional songs that really struck a chord with the night. Specifically, she kicked off the set with the song Notice Me, a song performed by the fictional character Bird in the book of the evening. Alecia did it justice with her tiny singing segment, but Alissa really took it all to another world altogether. It made me laugh when Alissa made a comment that she didn’t consider herself much of a singer when compared to one of her favorite co-writers because she was so amazingly talented. Again, I was not the only one to comment or say so out loud this evening.

49 singing 2

Before Alissa finished her eclectic set, she brought up her good friend Josh Charles (Dr. Josh as she coined later because he had learned some piano tricks from the Dr. John). Alissa switching to guitar several times during the show, they started off with a song that had an interesting change of tone and melody and backstory to anything that Bird’s book was telling. I believe it was called Tripwire, but I went away from it feeling like it could possibly be a song for Bird by book three or beyond … you know, when she goes on that Taylor Swift/Miley Cyrus PR downfall that inevitably comes along with any ounce of fame in this world these days. It was just a thought for the book series. But yeah, the second to last song really touched me more than any in awhile. It was exactly what I needed to hear after a good long day beforehand, mixed with the bitter cold outdoors lately. Alissa finished the set with her song Every Day, proving that this day, November 18th, 2014, was extraordinary and not like every other day.

I had both artists, who in fact hadn’t met in real life before this momentous occasion beyond calls and emails to inspire one another for writing the books and songs together in their own rights. I thought the event, the performances, and the closing conversation that explained their inspiration from and about this epic project put forward by Kathryn Williams was all very fitting … like baby bear soup, just right. Kathryn wasn’t there in person, staying cold but happily married in Maine, but she was there in spirit.

Before I say proper thanks to everyone that helped make this night so special for #49, I’ll let you partake in a wonderful tradition on these recaps. Here is the recording of the show, edited for your pleasure, so you can listen to Alecia and Alissa do what they were born to do and did for Nashville to help warm our cold season. This is the recording of East Side Storytellin’ 49. Feel free to share with others, over and over, and listen to countless times for yourself. Enjoy, over and over.

https://soundcloud.com/eastsidestorytn/sets/east-side-storytellin-49

 

art by Clay Brunton, printed by Kevin Anthuis at 5 Points Digital Imaging

art by Clay Brunton, printed by Kevin Anthuis at 5 Points Digital Imaging

Now, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Alecia Whitaker and Alissa Moreno (and Dr. Josh too) for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

You can read more from Alecia Whitaker here – http://www.aleciawhitaker.com

You can listen to more from Alissa Moreno here – http://www.alissamoreno.com

I’d also like to show much love to Clay Brunton for the beautiful artwork for the prints made by Kevin Anthuis at 5 Points Digital Imaging (http://5pdi.com) to celebrate tonight’s show.

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, Otis James for my wicked cool hat, my lovely wife and most talented artist in Emily Harper Beard (http://www.efharper.com), and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website, www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own Words Tab – see here –http://eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words/

But we are not finished.

The NEXT East Side Storytellin’ 50 event will be …

EAST SIDE STORYTELLIN’ 50

TUESDAY, December 2nd, 2014

Time- 7 pm sharp (Central)

Location- Mad Donna’s (1313 Woodland Street)- http://maddonnas.com

Need information or details about Mad Donna’s, call 615-226-1617. Otherwise, it is first come, first available seats.

Who will be featured- author Jewly Hight (https://twitter.com/rightbyherroots) and music by Angaleena Presley (http://www.angaleenapresley.com)

That’s all for the East Side Storytellin’ 49 show, two years of epic shows in the bag. Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word. Remember to be nice to one another out there. Thanks and good day your way.

Much love,

mE

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