RJ Bracchitta

Christopher Pilny, Abbey Moss, Chuck Beard, and Tom Eizonas

Thank YOU, thank YOU, thank YOU. Hello Again! Welcome to another wonderful collaboration between East Side Story and The Post. Let me be the first to officially, whole-heartedly welcome you to the recap and recording of the 122nd epic edition of East Side Storytellin’! Like the 121, I repeat … 121, previous shows East Side Story has put together, we all decided to take a break from our busy schedules all over town in order to sit back and relax and get everyone cultured up just right in the form of a Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Without further ado, fulfilling the entertainment portion of your day, this is recap and recording of East Side Storytellin’ 122. Let us begin, again.

Our first featured artist of the evening is a man of many words, many stories, and many great things to come. He is a writer out of Hope Valley, Rhode Island who now calls Nashville home. He is a producer for Rated Red, a digital media network here in Nashville, where he writes a weekly series called Strange Heartland History. I first met him via another outstanding writer and performer and East Side Storytellin’ alumnus in Melanie Vare via their work together with the award-winning storytelling show titled That Time of the Month. His essays and interviews have been featured on publications such as Salon, AskMen, British GQ, Business Insider, The Travel Channel, and more. After I secured the booking for his participation in this show, he promised me that he would share something that is somewhere in between a PG and R rating. As always, this guy never disappoints on stage. It was truly an honor to finally work together with this phenom who usually spends most of his time spotlighting others’ work, I’m talking about the one and only Christopher Pilny!

Christopher approached the podium with his tablet in hand and his confidence filling the friend-filled room. He later mentioned that he uses the tablet out of tradition of when he was too cheap (and didn’t have the money while in school) to print out pages of his work to read for others. Either way, like his writing, it works. There are layers upon layers of work that has been revised and rehearsed within the prose and the voice of this artist, and his final product and performances are delivered with a brilliance similar to an A-listed comedian. He lets the material do the magic that it has been created meticulously to do, and the crowd takes it from there (usually with ample amounts of belly laughs that are perfectly spaced out so that you can catch your breath for dramatic pauses and moments to connect even more with the points of Christopher’s stories). Y’all, he is that good (and will only keep getting better, with his creative process, routines, and dedication to his craft, on and off the stage).

Christopher opted to spend his time reading from a selected original work that was based on journal entries that later developed into a piece that was published in Salon (To read the published form, click HERE). In his classic personal narrator tone, he seemed to enjoy looking down and around his personal odyssey for how he found his voice and a professional foundation of creative writing by methodically detailing the ups and downs of his notes via his journal entries (written by a soon-to-be college graduate but with an air of a school girl finding out what love is and means to her through the mishaps of puberty). You didn’t have to be a guy working in women’s fashion or stressing over life plans after graduating from college to relate. Christopher has a gift of not only taking the less travelled road and enjoying it, he also has a knack for making plans that are larger than life and odd on purpose because he knows it will always add to and become part of a more interesting story in hindsight after it is experienced, written, and shared for others to incorporate that lesson into their own lives. Seriously, I love the way he chooses his life decisions of jobs and everything because I’ve tried to do similar things on my own journey. I haven’t done as many blatantly random choices for the sake of my story in humorous ways, but Christopher’s work reminds me that I still have time.

So yeah, Christopher’s story involved shout outs to David Sedaris, Eminem, Artie Lange (and who the F is Artie Lange, LOL), Forrest Gump, Christopher’s mom, and many others). It detailed the hilarious moments of school kids making fun of Christopher’s shoe fashion, the dark comedy of retail robbery and the possibility of becoming a martyr for the sake of Ralph Lauren Polo shirts, and more … I’m not starting to sound like an infomercial that is selling Christopher Pilny’s work like I’m his agent. But I am not his agent. I am just a big fan, and I’m not alone. Go ahead and take the time to explore his published works on the links above and below, and enjoy the full reading that he shared with us at The Post East in the recording below. In this day and age, we need all of the humor and intelligence that we can get. Lucky for all of us, Christopher Pilny delivers all of that every chance he gets.

Our featured music of the night is a singer, songwriter, and a composer like you’ve never known. Her style is sort of like apocalyptic, but in the best of ways. She is also a dear friend of our friend RJ Bracchitta. She creates an eccentric musical identity desperate to make its way into the mainstream music. She draws from a theatrical past and a brooding alter ego while combining melodies and lyrics in ways that are quite bewitching. Her music usually falls within the ranges of Indie Rock and Cinematic Pop. She has self-proclaimed her music insightful, unapologetic, and downright spooky. We figured she would be the perfect start to put 2017 behind us and really hit the ground running for 2018. Thanks to RJ Bracchita for sharing the love for his fellow friend to be spotlighted and more known because from the first note of sound check, I was completely in awe and floored by the talents of Abbey Moss.

Abbey embodies everything of how she presents herself on  her website bio and, like Christopher, much more, in the best of ways. She approached the stage with just a ukulele in tow and a world of stories and melodies to share, bright and loud. And with all of the doom and gloom surrounding our world in the news these days, it was nice for Abbey to kick things off in her set with the happier side of her song collection to date. She smiled and said that she would go from happy to sad throughout her time at The Post, and we were sitting, thankful and ready to listen.

Abbey sang songs about Mr. Right Guy (where love is everywhere if we look because it’s as simple as just being an animal instinct), taking chances on me (a sweet but not so sweet song because it was about an ex-boyfriend), and then she dove into the dark. I don’t necessarily mean total blackness though. When I say dark, I just mean that she dove into her songs involving death. Actually, it was more light and illuminating, as she broke out with concepts of what it may be like on the other side of life and relating it specifically to a bar on the river Styx that you can’t leave once you get in (but the drinks are forever flowing and your pretty bones will be just fine). Entrancing stuff, to say the least.

She then dove into a beautiful song about laying a lover down and layering the lyrics with the story of the metaphor of putting things to rest. She explained it better than I will now, before she sang her songs, but the meaning and wonder of life lesson cycles totally reminded me of the beautiful documentary I saw recently by the name of Samsara (you can check the trailer HERE). Abbey pushes the boundaries of thoughts and volume within the words she sings in ways that allow you to appreciate the singular moment we live in but at the same time reflect and feel the deeper meaning beyond the surface of the present. Marinate on that for a moment.

Before Abbey closed her set with an unfinished song about love letters in the works, she belted out a vision of a song titled Phoenix. Inspired by the story of her good friend battling Cancer, she did what only a best friend could do to help a trying situation and inspire the friend being tested by reminding them of their purpose and strength. Again, like most of these songs, I cannot give them the justice they deserve as much as just you taking the time to listen to Abbey sing them so great for yourself. You can check them out in the recording link below of the show. Side note, if you or anyone you know is battling Cancer at the moment or did before or just got diagnosed, please refer everyone to Gilda’s Club Nashville. It is FREE support, and it is a magical place for those who need magic. And who doesn’t need magic in their lives? Check out Gilda’s Club Nashville HERE.

But before I get to the recording, I would like to say that once again I felt blessed to take a few candid moments of the artists’ and crowd’s time to talk a little more about the passion and practices behind the show curtain and what has made these guys inspired enough to make the decision to live their lives as artists. It’s not an easy road, even for the most well-known artists out there, so we all need a reminder that we are not alone in this deal. Like those who came before, Abbey and Christopher shared their hopes, fears, lessons learned, happy times, battles with adversity, all the while being completely honest by saying that they are still just literally making things up as they go. Lucky for us, they are doing exactly what they need and want to be doing, and they see the signs and realize that the learning and the process is all happening when it is supposed to be happening. Nothing was more evident of this than when Abbey made a comment post-show that she was at one of Christopher’s first public readings of his work across town years before this particular paring came into fruition. It’s stuff like that that reminds me everything we are doing here is worthwhile and makes a positive change in the world beyond our immediate comprehension. So, here’s to more positive signs and changes in the New Year together!

So here it is, after writing and talking about it throughout the text above, this is the edited recording of East Side Storytellin’ 122, the night when Christopher Pilny and Abbey Moss brought light, life, death, humor, and a good heart to a New Year. This was recorded at The Post East on Tuesday, January  2, 2018. Feel free to listen to this link and share it with everyone you know, over and over again. You’re welcome.

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Christopher & Abbey for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

You can read more of Christopher’s writing here- christopherpilny.com

You can listen to more of Abbey’s music here – www.abbeymoss.com

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website, www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own WordsTab – see here – www.eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, my lovely wife and most talented artist in Emily Harper Beard (efharper), and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

Last, but certainly not least, I’d like to give one last shout out to Tonya and Chris for making The Post so welcoming and positively life-changing for the East Nashville community at large.

Our next show will be

East Side Storytellin’ 123
Tuesday, January 16th
at The Post (1701 Fatherland Street) at 7pm
reading- John Winston Heacock
singing- Madison Pepper (Peppersaid)

That said, that’s all for East Side Storytellin’ 122 and another fabulous event at The Post with East Side Story at the helm. Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word and giving some love to all of these great Nashville artists and our creative ideas. Please remember to be nice to one another out there.

Much love,
mE

{ 0 comments }

Anna Harris, Joe B. Ingle, India Ramey, Chuck Beard, and Tom Eizonas

Thank YOU, thank YOU, thank YOU. Hello Again! Welcome to another wonderful collaboration between East Side Story and The Post. Let me be the first to officially, whole-heartedly welcome you to the recap and recording of the 121st epic edition of East Side Storytellin’! Like the 120, I repeat … 120, previous shows East Side Story has put together, we all decided to take a break from our busy schedules all over town in order to sit back and relax and get everyone cultured up just right in the form of a Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Without further ado, fulfilling the entertainment portion of your day, this is the recap and recording of East Side Storytellin’ 121. Let us begin, again.

The first featured artist of the night is a United Church of Christ minister, reverend actually, respected author and public speaker. He is a leading voice in faith-based opposition to the death penalty. He is a graduate of Union Theological Seminary, has been the chaplain to dozens of people on death row over the past 40 years across the South (which is quite impressive since he is only 41 years old). It’s almost like he was born to do this. I first met him at East Side Story, where he allowed me the opportunity to promote and sell one of his books titled “Slouching Toward Tyranny: Mass Incarcerations, Death Sentences, and Racism.” As you can imagine, it is not a very light read, but I believe it is something everyone should check out. It was always an honor to talk book shop and life in general with this guy, and I knew this special night wasn’t going to be any different for everyone present. I’m talking about the man, the legend, Reverend Joe B. Ingle!

Joe took to the stage with his calm confidence, and prefaced his reading by telling everyone in the crowd about the various published books he had written on the table laid out in front of the podium so others could get a good idea about his work if they didn’t know about it already. Joe is very humble about his work and activism, but don’t think for one second that that makes him shy about sharing his mission and purpose within the cause. Instead of dabbling in each of his poignant non-fictional books about the prison system and examples of the wrongfulness of the death sentence in general, Joe took this opportunity and his time to share with us a new project that is autobiographical throughout. As mentioned in the title line to this blog, this work has been titled “Beauty & Madness: Growing Up Southern.” I, and others in the crowd, was instantly hooked from the start.

With a Shakespearian aspect of material and delivery, Joe jumped right into his intro and the first chapter of his youth. Set in the winter of 1954, about 30 miles outside of the Research Triangle of North Carolina, Joe threw us in the middle of a very personal basketball game and halftime show that involved his sister and his father predominantly. We didn’t find out the final score of the game or how his sister Kaye running on the court during play in the first half affected Joe’s play in the second. Instead, we were privy to a gut-wrenching account of a childhood and family trauma that few have experienced and that I can only imagine. I’m talking about the race to save a father who was in pain and in need of emergency help. I’m talking about the death of a patriarch in one night but also told and experienced in a childhood haze of slow motion trauma.

One, meaning I, had to wonder if this experience with death, up close and very personal, had an astounding affect on Joe to later pursue a passion of helping relieve others facing man-made death sentences in horrid prison conditions. I can only think that it didn’t hurt that inclination. That said, Joe was the utmost professional as he read from something so honest and personal that a lesser person would have been sobbing and ripping the pages out during the reading. Let’s just say, I’m not sure that I could’ve had the strength to share that with anyone had it been me at this moment, no matter how long ago it took place. I value Joe’s friendship and courage to live the story and mission that has been delivered on his plate. We are all better for having listened to Joe, that’s for sure.

Our featured music of the night is fresh off of firing on all cylinders with her magical third album and national debut, “Snake Handler.” She is the perfect combination of Americana noire and southern-gothic songwriting, with a twist of something awesome that hasn’t been labeled yet. Fitting for the post-reading tonight, her album is filled with stories of Pentecostal churches, broken households, crooked family trees, forgotten pockets of the Deep South, and domestic violence. But don’t you worry, nobody is going to get hurt by listening to her music, even if it self-proclaimed metal music that comes out country (t-shirt idea in the making). Before coming to Nashville, this lady worked as a Deputy District Attorney in Montgomery, Alabama. Recently acknowledged for her latest record by Rolling Stone as someone to know, and being accompanied by her talented friends Anna Harris and Javi Jones (East Side Storytellin’ alumni in their own right), I was more than honored and excited to welcome the always amazing India Ramey to the show family.

India is another one of those dynamite storytellers and entertainers who will sneak up on stage without trying to grab your attention and then explode your world with awesome once she starts singing and sharing her talents on a live mic (she could probably still explode your world singing unplugged too). She opened her set with the her recent title track of “Snake Handler”, prefacing the song by stating it is a literal and figurative tale of everyone dealing with the snakes in their head too. It was about facing arrogance and ignorance  while not showing any weaknesses on your journey. Playing a solid 6 chords with fierce strokes that could break any of the guitar strings at any moment and gifting us all with a voice and words that derive from somewhere inside her soul that is deeper than most will go and when it does reach you, it echoes into your own face like it’s been shot out of a cavern or cannon and crashes into your reality over and over again like waves when the tide rolls in on the shore (had to get one Roll Tide! comment for the Alabama shout out, but it’s all true).

Starting with the story about handling snakes, she then followed suit with our mutual ESS’ alumnus friend and magical storyteller Rayvon Pettis by sharing a song written about the TVA outside of Alabama and Georgia combined territory. An absolute beautifully haunting tale about the living and the dead drifting away and the relationship and respect the living have for those used and/or forgotten and misplaced in transition with a song titled “Drown Town”. You’ll hear it in the recording below, but the sheer amount of layers and personal histories packed into every one of India’s songs is both breathtaking and inspiring to anyone trying to convey meaningful material in any medium these days. You know when you can package surface with substance that is both equally wonderful and moving, that is a sure fire recipe for quality art. I know I’m starting to sound like India’s publicist, but I’m honestly just a fan and friend. She is that good. Besides, she doesn’t need a publicist, when she’s that good. Instead of tooting her own horn in between songs, she actually surprised me and everyone in the crowd and in the band when she asked Anna to step out of the backing light to lead the set with a song of her own called “Rapture City” … a song that had never seen the light of day or had been performed in public to that point in time. Like India’s songs, Anna didn’t hesitate to blow us all away with the tone and importance of every single word, melody, and message she wanted to convey in her short time there. Again, you can listen to it below, and see how shocked and surprised she was before she threw that to the side and rocked us all in this picture.

Before and after Anna did her thing, India claimed her thrown of a shining star that Nashville needs here and now by sharing two songs. One was her antithesis to Bro-Country and how those big phonies really don’t know what it’s like to find joy in small towns because they’ve never really lived in small towns and were poor (like most of their listeners who chug beer from solo cups to escape realities). It gave me the feeling of say a rapper trying to sound harder than they really know because of just trying to sell records (think comparing Luke Bryan and Florida Georgia Line to that of Rick Ross and you’ll see what I’m saying). Anyways, it was terrific. India and the gang finished the set with a song about a family redemption story about saying goodbye to her not so great father before his death. Again, not planning or curating any of the material from India or Joe, this is as serendipitous as life can get without misusing that term. And, again with India, she knocked it out of the park while taking one last walk off victory lap around the bases for the night. Take a listen to it all below, and let me know what you think for yourself. Prepare to be amazed.

And like every show I put together, I was able to get both Joe and India back on stage together to share some more personal stories, answers, and what ended up being shared praise for their own newfound friendship and respect for each other’s personal journey. India spoke about how important her husband letting the family uplift everything they had been working on for a decade and moving to Nashville to start a new path and friendships changed everything. Then Joe told his wife and India’s husband to stand up to be recognized for the solid teamwork for making every dream work to date for the featured artists.

Neither of these artists displaying an ego to write home about, these two artists join the ranks of people who are doing very important things for others to find their own purpose and happiness in this life, all the while doing everything they can to not waste any time or energy they can share with others while also making the most of their lives as well. It was a natural back and forth of meaningful and very relatable answers that everyone in the crowd could follow along and learn from with ease. I was merely tossing the ball on the court and letting these two professionals enjoy hitting it back and forth like a fun tennis match where nobody was counting score and there was nothing more than love. Like the majority of these show pairings, I should add that I totally could see these two doing more together in the near future, be it helping to add volume and unity with protests against a corrupt prison system and laws, or just helping others find their way back on their right paths. Point being, it was an honor to share the stage and a very special evening with these too kindred and fearless and altruistic souls. It’s very easy to smile and feel hope for humanity when around this crew.

So here it is, after writing and talking about it throughout the text above, this is the edited recording of East Side Storytellin’ 121 the night when Joe Ingle and India Ramey (alongside Anna Harris and Javi Jones) allowed us to explore the wonder and awe and redemption of every Southern tragedy. This was recorded at The Post East on Tuesday, December 19, 2017. Feel free to listen to this link and share it with everyone you know, over and over again. You’re welcome.

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for Joe and India (and Anna & Javi) for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

You can listen to more of India’s music here – http://indiaramey.com

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website, www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own Words Tab – see here – www.eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words



I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, my lovely wife and most talented artist in Emily Harper Beard (efharper), and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

Last, but certainly not least, I’d like to give one last shout out to Tonya and Chris for making The Post so welcoming and positively life-changing for the East Nashville community at large.

Our next show will be
East Side Storytellin’ 122
Tuesday, January 2nd
at The Post (1701 Fatherland Street) at 7pm
reading- Christopher Pilny
singing- Abbey Moss

That said, that’s all for East Side Storytellin’ 121 and another fabulous event at The Post with East Side Story at the helm. Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word and giving some love to all of these great Nashville artists and our creative ideas. Please remember to be nice to one another out there.

Much love,
mE

{ 0 comments }

RJ Bracchitta, Abigail Flowers, Tom Eizonas, James Collins, and Chuck Beard

Thank YOU, thank YOU, thank YOU. Hello Again! Welcome to another wonderful collaboration between East Side Story and The Post. Let me be the first to officially, whole-heartedly welcome you to the recap and recording 116th epic edition of East Side Storytellin’! Like the 115, I repeat … 115, previous shows East Side Story has put together, we all decided to take a break from our busy schedules all over town in order to sit back and relax and get everyone cultured up just right in the form of a Nashville writer reading from original prose, followed by an amazing local musician performing and talking about their original music, and then a round-up creative conversation with all featured guests of this event to talk about their individual journeys and personal ties to Nashville. Without further ado, fulfilling the entertainment portion of your day, this is the recap and recording of East Side Storytellin’ 116. Let us begin, again.

Our first featured artist of the evening is a published poet who has earned a wide variety of writing credits that include plays, musicals, book adaptations for theater, national advertising copy and articles for the St. Petersburg Times and other publications. He has also written non-violent curriculum for schools. He taught creative writing for 6 years for 2 Art Councils in Tampa and St. Petersburg, Florida. Since moving to Nashville, he has written and published 5 books for children, as well as 3 books of poetry…such a slacker. On this given night, we were honored to have him share some new, fresh off the kitchen counter, original work with us. I’m talking about the always refreshing and talented James Collins.

James kicked off his set by announcing to the crowd that he is weird, his words are weird, and this reading was going to be weird, all while shuffling through his prepared work that he had continuously edited and prepared up until the last second. Some of the poems had lines through the title, and those lines were put there mere minutes before the show started. That’s how fresh this material was. I told James during the pre-show that sharing creative work that nobody has ever heard or seen before typically gets an astute audience even further on the edge of their seats. This is exactly what happened as James began to deliver his “weird” poetry.

But the thing about it was that none of the poetry or reading was weird at all. James knew exactly where he was going and how he wanted to take us with him, as we walked hand in hand with his poetic walk in the park. And this walk took us places such as trying to find love, natural love, hidden treasures while making journeys through men’s work from the head to the heart, and then several poems about the art of aging. Despite the comedic, self-defecating comments about James aging more than most in the crowd (obviously, like the laws of gravity, we are all aging at the same rate in this room), I think the aging content and ideas behind our various processes of accepting our everyday age increase were spot on and absolutely brilliant. Then, after nearly dropping the mic with a poem about the recent eclipse experience, James ended with a cure and a remedy speech as his official/unofficial encore (as demanded by the crowd). There are so many great lines that I took note of during James’ set, but the overall adventure between birth and death was at the heart of it all … it always is.

Our featured music of the night was provided by someone who was making the third time a featured charm since she had already shared the East Side Storytellin’ stage as a friend to Ally Brown and Kira Hooks. She is a versatile vocalist with a passion for great melodies. Since picking up her first ukulele in 2011, she has been busy combining her smooth vocal tone with the instrument’s simple sound to produce an intimate and emotional musical experience you will soon behold. But on this particular event, she left the trusted ukulele at home and instead brought her trusted and talented friend RJ Bracchitta on the guitar. But back to the featured musician. She is a vocalist and songwriter with specialties in jazz, Latin, and singer-songwriter styles. And she has a heart and voice of gold. I’m talking about the bright star on the meteoric rise named Abigail Flowers.

Abigail, who came straight to the show from a church choir practice, immediately brought us good karma, good stories, and a great lead song called “Bobby.” She told a short story behind the song. It was about a homeless man/friend she met while doing social work for a year in the Houston area. It was a journey of questions about life, heaven, and everything in between. It was clear that her time in Houston had been a profound experience because she went into another original song about other long-distance friendships from that time right after Bobby.

From Houston to family inspired songs, Abigail opened her heart and her vocals by sharing the sweetest 60th anniversary gift any granddaughter has ever made and given to their grandparents. As is the case in most of these recaps, I can’t fully give the story or song justice more than you taking time to check it out yourself in the recording below, but know that there were quite a few eyes in the crowd that needed tissues = happy tears, of course. But then, switching from family to relationships with boys who love Hanson, Abigail and RJ revved up the rhythm and soon began playing harmonies off of each other like a dance. They ended the set with a song called “Enough.” It was a beautiful reminder that there’s nothing out there when you’re searching for the wrong things, but there’s more than enough in the world when you are searching for the good stuff. And she sang that we get more things by giving it all away. I couldn’t have said or sang it better on this given day.

From the music ending, I let RJ jump back into the audience while asking James to return to the stage. Then Abigail and James took me on a quite the conversation about their creative upbringings, adversities, support and lack there of, and honestly articulating what makes them tick each time they go to write new material. They have a few years and different insights between them, but there was a similar passion for finding and sharing the truths they find to be self-evident in their stories. It was an absolute pleasure to share some quality time together while talking with these two humble and great artists.

So here it is, the edited recording of East Side Storytellin’ 116, the show where we featured James Collins and Abigail Flowers (with RJ Bracchitta) at The Post East on Tuesday, October 3, 2017. Feel free to enjoy and share it with everyone you know, over and over again.

Before I say goodbye for this round of fun, I’d like to give a big round of thanks for James & Abigail for sharing their stories, talents, and time with us.

You can listen to more of Abigail’s music here – www.abigailflowersmusic.com

You can listen to this show, edited, soon, alongside the previous shows too, on our website,www.eastsidestorytn.com, at our In Our Own WordsTab – see here – www.eastsidestorytn.com/in-our-own-words

I’ll keep the gratitude going for Tom Eizonas, my lovely wife and most talented artist in Emily Harper Beard (efharper), and everyone that came out live to support the show … and to everyone who has helped continue to spread the word and support the show online afterwards.

Last, but certainly not least, I’d like to give one last shout out to Tonya and Chris for making The Post so welcoming and positively life-changing for the East Nashville community at large.

Our next show will be

East Side Storytellin’ 117

Tuesday, October 17th

at The Post (1701 Fatherland Street) at 7pm

reading- Carter F. Smith

singing- Ali Sperry

That said, that’s all for East Side Storytellin’ 116 and another fabulous event at The Post with East Side Story at the helm. Thanks for coming out and sharing the good word and giving some love to all of these great Nashville artists and our creative ideas. Please remember to be nice to one another out there.

Much love,

mE

{ 0 comments }